In today’s episode, Kyle and Jeff explore some outdated summertime health and wellness myths that we can probably just discard. We also visit with Dr. Rodney Hansen, a Nutrition Professor at Weber State University, about the KETO diet. Is it for everyone? Is it for you? Is it for anyone? Dr. Hansen breaks it down… scientifically. Check this one out Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life podcast.

 

Kyle Case:
Hello and welcome to the Huntsman World Senior Games active life. My name is Kyle Case and I'll be your host on this amazing journey as we attempt to help you get the most out of your life. Joining in the studio today is my copilot, Jeff Harding. Jeff, how are you today?

Jeff Harding:
I am glad to be back, Kyle. It's been a few weeks and I'm just glad to be back.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. There's been a little bit of vacation and road trips and work and [crosstalk 00:00:32]. Some car trouble we got to throw that in the mix.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah. [crosstalk 00:00:36].

Kyle Case:
Of the journey as well.

Jeff Harding:
But I'm here today and I'm happy to be here. And how are you doing Kyle?

Kyle Case:
I'm doing good.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
It's a great day. It's summer.

Jeff Harding:
It is.

Kyle Case:
And with summer Jeff, I found maybe like any time of year, but I suppose that we hear all kinds of health advice that is relative to the season. Right?

Jeff Harding:
Well. Sure.

Kyle Case:
You've heard the summer things and the winter things and all that kind of stuff.

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Today, I want to share a couple of summertime health myths that you should just go ahead and discard.

Jeff Harding:
So these are myths that I can just throw away.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. If you've heard them before and you subscribe to them, just get rid of them.

Jeff Harding:
Just a minute, I'm going to get the garbage can out. Okay. I'm ready.

Kyle Case:
Okay. This is all according to the daily mail online magazine. And I think it's relevant given the season and it's just probably time to put some of these things to bed.

Jeff Harding:
Okay. Let's do it.

Kyle Case:
Number one, the cold from your AC can give you a cold. You ever heard that before?

Jeff Harding:
Well, I've heard people hint at it, but yeah, that's [crosstalk 00:01:31]. No.

Kyle Case:
You don't believe it. Yeah, well you shouldn't believe it, because it's not true. But they're [inaudible 00:01:35] so they sound the same, but they're two different kinds of cold.

Jeff Harding:
That's true.

Kyle Case:
And they shouldn't be confused. So temperature changes can be uncomfortable, but they certainly don't make you sick. However, extreme cold temperatures can weaken your immune system. But-

Jeff Harding:
And invite something to come in.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. But we're not talking about the cold from your car AC or your home AC, so throw that one away. That one's not true.

Jeff Harding:
It's gone.

Kyle Case:
Number two, you can't get sunburns when it's cloudy.

Jeff Harding:
That's such a lie.

Kyle Case:
You've heard that one before, right?

Jeff Harding:
[crosstalk 00:02:04].

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Some people say what you can't see can't hurt you. But unfortunately, that is not true. Sunlight isn't always visible.

Jeff Harding:
That's true.

Kyle Case:
Because sometimes it's behind the clouds. But even though none of the strongest rays are peeking through the clouds, the UV rays that can cause skin damage to seep through pretty much anything.

Jeff Harding:
Which you can't see anyway.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, you can't see the sun.

Jeff Harding:
We can't see the UV rays.

Kyle Case:
Exactly. You can't see the UV rays.

Jeff Harding:
The rays are causing the burn. You can't see when there clouds there or not. So you just never know.

Kyle Case:
So the good advice is to put on sunscreen every time you go outside, even when it's cloudy.

Jeff Harding:
That's right.

Kyle Case:
That's just good advice. Here's another one. I know you've heard this one before. You can't swim for 30 minutes after eating.

Jeff Harding:
Well, some of us can't swim anyway, but I've heard that one.

Kyle Case:
So yeah. We've all labored under this one. And maybe subscribed to it or maybe not. But if you've ever attended a pool party as a child, you know that mom or grandma is going to say you can't swim till 30 minutes after you eat.

Jeff Harding:
Or you are friends if they've had their moms say to them.

Kyle Case:
Exactly. But that's not true there. There may be the worst-case scenario is a little bit of cramping, but that's just a little bit of discomfort. Nothing beyond that is going to be the problem when you swim after 30 minutes. Except for consuming alcohol.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
If you've consumed alcohol, it's probably not a good idea to [crosstalk 00:03:21].

Jeff Harding:
Even hours after.

Kyle Case:
Or the lake.

Jeff Harding:
You want to stay away from water.

Kyle Case:
Here's one that I'd never heard before, but if someone had told it to me, I probably would've said, "Yeah, that makes sense." I think I would buy into that one.

Jeff Harding:
Okay. I'm ready.

Kyle Case:
It's that saltwater like or ocean water is good for cuts.

Jeff Harding:
I hadn't heard that one either.

Kyle Case:
I hadn't heard it before either. But it's not true.

Jeff Harding:
No. It just [inaudible 00:03:41].

Kyle Case:
So if someone does say that to you, then just know that it's not true.

Jeff Harding:
No. You have to get your dog to lick it.

Kyle Case:
There you go.

Jeff Harding:
[inaudible 00:03:48] a dog licks are better for your cuts than this ocean water.

Kyle Case:
Everyone should know that. Right? So the thing is, that ocean water it feels ... like to me I would have bought into it because it feels like it stings, so therefore it must be good. Right?

Jeff Harding:
It's sanitizing it [inaudible 00:04:01].

Kyle Case:
That's the concept, but it's not true because there's plenty of bacteria and unsavory things in ocean water as well.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, there is.

Kyle Case:
So rinsing off your cut in saltwater is just risky and exposure to all that bad stuff that's floating around in the ocean. Instead of submerging your cut in ocean water or salt water until the skin is healed, the best thing to do is just keep it clean, wash it with soap and water.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
It's common sense, right?

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Here's another one that I've heard before that I also discarded a long time ago. But butter eases sunburns. You haven't heard that one?

Jeff Harding:
I've seen people put [crosstalk 00:04:34].

Kyle Case:
You can smear a greasy stick of butter on your skin [crosstalk 00:04:39].

Jeff Harding:
It's never letting heat out.

Kyle Case:
Exactly. It's not going to ease your sunburn. It's probably going to make it worse just because of what you said. It does trap the heat on the surface of your skin. Instead of wasting the butter that you could use on corn on the cob.

Jeff Harding:
Or toast or something.

Kyle Case:
Or toast. Just run cold water over your sunburn and that'll help some. Here's the last one. I know you've heard this one too, but again, I hope you've discarded it. You can't swallow the black watermelon seeds.

Jeff Harding:
If that were the case, I'd be dead a long time, because I've been eating them my whole life.

Kyle Case:
There's no need.

Jeff Harding:
Too much of it to spit them out.

Kyle Case:
There's no need to go digging around in your slice of watermelon if you don't want to. Of course, spitting the seeds out is part of the fun of eating them, but they're not going to poison you. They are not going to grow a watermelon tree in your tummy.

Jeff Harding:
Especially since there's no such thing as watermelon tree, they're a plant.

Kyle Case:
Exactly. Or a vine. Right? But just like the seeds from other fruits, they can't be digested, so your body's just going to simply pass them on through your digestive system without any ill effects.

Jeff Harding:
So that's why they don't want you to eat watermelon when you're at a house [inaudible 00:05:37] or camping, because the seeds get passed into the septic system and they don't handle that well.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Well, there you go.

Jeff Harding:
Yup.

Kyle Case:
Now, we know of some things that we can just miss that we can just get rid of.

Jeff Harding:
You know what? I just feel like this is a day when we're going to bang many myths.

Kyle Case:
I think that it might be. Today's guest is none other than Dr. Rodney Hansen. A nutrition professor at Weber State University here, and has an undergraduate degree at Idaho State University, where he was also a collegiate athlete and cross country and track. He completed both his master's degree in exercise physiology, as well as his doctoral degree in nutritional sciences from Colorado State University. And we've had Dr. Hansen on the show before. Welcome back.

Dr. Hansen:
Thanks. It's great to be back.

Kyle Case:
Any myths that you would add to that list that we've just got to get rid of?

Dr. Hansen:
I know more myths. I'm here also representing Utahrunning.com.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Dr. Hansen:
And I have a big interest in the Huntsman Games and it's again, good to be back here again.

Kyle Case:
Well, awesome. We're glad to have you back and look forward to our visit. Today we're going to talk about a topic that's a hot one out there. A lot of people are subscribing to it.

Jeff Harding:
Especially on social media.

Kyle Case:
Especially on social media. But also just that plain old word of mouth gets around. We're going to talk about the Keto diet today.

Dr. Hansen:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
So let's jump right into it by, first of all, explaining for those of us who maybe have heard of it but aren't familiar with what it is. What is the Keto diet?

Dr. Hansen:
The Keto diet is, where you force the body to make ketones. That's the quick and broad answer, but what is Keto? It is a form of starvation.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Dr. Hansen:
And that is what is missed. You mentioned that there's a lot of interest in it and a lot of what I call testimonials and driven by social media. And what people are overlooking, is the science behind what is happening, when you make ketone bodies.

Kyle Case:
So that's the result of what we're trying to get to. But what does it look like? Like if I'm a Keto practitioner, what does my everyday diet look like?

Dr. Hansen:
Your diet is, it could be low in calories, most likely it is very high, too high in fat.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Dr. Hansen:
And very, very low in carbohydrate.

Kyle Case:
Okay. So that's just calling carbs. You want to cut out the carbs and increase the fats?

Dr. Hansen:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Okay. So that's the Keto diet. So examples of food would be, don't eat bread but do eat bacon.

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. Exactly. Yeah, anything that is a fat [crosstalk 00:08:19].

Kyle Case:
Okay. So that gives you an idea of what we're talking about when we say, Keto.

Dr. Hansen:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
We're talking about low carbs, high fat.

Dr. Hansen:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Okay. And you mentioned just right off the bat that's a starvation technique. That's a starvation approach because you're eliminating a very important aspect of your nutritional needs.

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. It is you're eliminating carbohydrate. Now a little bit more about starvation. There are many forms of starvation, not just one. I think when I say starvation or you mentioned it, people think of no calories at all, kind of the prison camp kind of ways in a way of starvation. That is one kind.

Jeff Harding:
Those pictures of those little children in Africa with the bloated bellies from not having any food in them.

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. That would be another form of starvation. It could be that's called kwashiorkor. And that is protein starvation. And so there are many different kinds of starvation. I would even make the argument like scurvy. What is that a starvation of well, vitamin C?

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Absolutely.

Dr. Hansen:
There are many different nutrients we have to have in our body. If you eliminate any of them, then you will go into starvation mode. Now one thing about starvation that is true no matter what kind it is, it is detrimental to your health and it will result in death. It is lethal.

Kyle Case:
So we want to avoid that.

Dr. Hansen:
We want to avoid starvation. I'm against starvation, because of that.

Jeff Harding:
Well. And it's not fun either.

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. It's not fun either. Yeah.

Kyle Case:
So I think you're convincing me as well. Let's avoid the starvation aspect, right? So Keto is as we said, it eliminates the carbs up until the fat. We hear though, as we said on social media or just as you said, testimonials. That "Man, I've been doing this and I've been losing a lot of weight." So where are we going with that? Like how do we get past that concept of, it seems to be working for me?

Dr. Hansen:
Well. We need to look at the science.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Dr. Hansen:
And a couple of things upfront that I hear a lot, are that Keto will enhance fat metabolism and that is not correct.

Kyle Case:
So that's the one that I have heard. Like you get these ketones gone and it helps burn that fat. And that's what we want to do because we're carrying around too much fat anyway. So that's the part that I've heard a lot when we talk about Keto.

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. And we'll look at the signs of that in a minute. And show why that isn't true. And we've known this for a very long time. Now the second thing about the weight loss, I agree that it causes weight loss.

Kyle Case:
You're going to lose weight.

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. You will lose weight. But it is crucial to understand it is the wrong kind of weight. And we'll discuss that as well. And then come back to what is happening with these ketones that you get, when you starve yourself of carbohydrate.

Kyle Case:
So let's jump into that. So that's a phrase that you also hear connected, the ketones and ketosis. On the surface, let's admit it sounds intriguing. As I said, we've got too much fat. The thing we want to do is get rid of fat, right?

Dr. Hansen:
We want to get rid of fat. Yup.

Kyle Case:
What's the science?

Dr. Hansen:
Let's look at the science. It's one of those things I tell people, I don't make the rules, I play by them. So the biochemistry is what I'm basing all this on. And I'll try to keep it as simple as I can. But when you use fat, metabolize fat, you turn it into energy. And when you're using fat, is a process called beta-oxidation, you break down fat into essentially two carbon units, okay?

Dr. Hansen:
And these two carbon units, to completely use those units those two carbon units, you need to have carbohydrate. Now, 30 years ago when I was getting a degree in exercise physiology, and it is still true today, I remember learning a phrase. That fat burns in a carbohydrate flame. And it is true. To completely use fat, you need to have a little bit of carbohydrate, just a little bit.

Dr. Hansen:
The body wants to use fat. And if you are in good shape training for the Huntsman games, you're enhancing your ability to use fat. And so that is how you enhance fat metabolism. But let's go back to those two carbon units that you're making. And let's go back to the starvation that is happening. When you're starved of carbohydrate, then you can't use those two carbon fragments and complete the fat metabolism.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Dr. Hansen:
Now, they do not magically disappear.

Kyle Case:
That's what I was going to say. So what happens to them?

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. What happens to them? Your body will buy time by taking those two carbon units and making them into ketone bodies and there're three of them. And the one that I'll mention is, I'll hear people say, "Yeah, I've adapted to ketosis and ketone metabolism." And they'll mention beta-hydroxybutyrate, BHB. And you can get kits to prick your finger and see if you've got that in your blood. And I'll hear that then you've adapted to ketone use.

Dr. Hansen:
And actually, I counter say, "No, there is no adaption going on there whatsoever." What's happening is, you have a whole bunch of these two carbon units that your body has to do something with. So it'll make a four-carbon fat metabolite and store it in your blood. This type of fat is actually what's called soluble. It'll mix with water and your blood is mainly [crosstalk 00:14:08].

Dr. Hansen:
So you're buying time when people say, "Hey, I'm starting to adapt to ketosis." I counter and say, "No, you're buying time so that you don't die."

Kyle Case:
Let's just be candid here, right? I'm not going to pull any punches. You're just buying time so that you don't die.

Dr. Hansen:
You don't die. Your body has to do something with those. And so it'll store it in the blood until it can metabolize them completely. And that's the second part of this whole story.

Kyle Case:
Okay. So what is the second part? Because now you've got me like, all these ketones are like floating around in your blood. That feels like that's probably not going to be a good thing.

Dr. Hansen:
It's not a good thing. Your body does have some very minor ways of getting rid of them. They even spill into your urine a little bit, but this is not good. Usually, when you get ketones in your urine, you should go to a doctor.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Dr. Hansen:
But anyway, what happens to those ketones? Well, you're buying time. That is what ketosis is when you've got lots of ketones in your bloodstream. Now, let's take a step back. To use to completely metabolize fat, you have to have a little bit of carbohydrate.

Kyle Case:
Now, when you say a little bit, like just a little bit about like a six-pack of snickers bars or are you talking about like one piece of toast?

Dr. Hansen:
I'm talking about, I'll use-

Kyle Case:
I'm trying to cover up all our basis here.

Jeff Harding:
Please don't break my heart.

Dr. Hansen:
You have to have what I would call adequate. And I'm sidestepping your question, but I think I can better address it in just a minute.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Dr. Hansen:
But you have to have carbohydrate in your diet. Okay. To completely metabolize, so you're buying time. Now what the body will do, it will start to do something called gluconeogenesis. And that means to arise new glucose. And it will make glucose carbohydrate out of what's called lean body mass. And I brought in my toys.

Dr. Hansen:
I've got a model of a pound of fat. I could hold it in both hands here. This is a plastic model. But it will make it from muscle.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Dr. Hansen:
My prop that I have in my hand. Now let's do some numbers because this is all science and the numbers don't lie. Okay. Now I'm going to better answer your question about the adequacy that you have to have to stay alive. Now we're not talking about training at all, we're talking about just staying alive. You're going to need about 150 grams of carbohydrate per day.

Kyle Case:
Every day.

Dr. Hansen:
Every day.

Jeff Harding:
And what does that look like in food?

Dr. Hansen:
In food, it would look, I want to say-

Jeff Harding:
A bowl of cereal?

Dr. Hansen:
Well, a couple of bowls. Yeah. It would look like, not very much. I'll put it that way. It depends on what type you're talking about. And this is where I would say I should've brought the wife in, who's a dietician to give us a better description. But to answer your question, what would it look like? From the body, you can get about 150 grams of carbohydrate out of a pound of muscle. I'm holding it up in my hands to show both of you.

Dr. Hansen:
But I'm holding about, think of like a one-pound roast. There you go, or four-quarter pounders or something like that. Now that is lean body mass. I can convert the energy in this into energy and carbohydrate and use about 150 grams of lean body mass to do that.

Kyle Case:
So you're just eating your muscles.

Dr. Hansen:
Exactly.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. That is what gluconeogenesis is. And so I'm going to step back to my second point about, I agree with people when they say, "I'm losing weight on Keto." And I agree, but what they're losing is lean body mass muscle.

Kyle Case:
Which you don't want to lose. [crosstalk 00:18:14]. I'm pointing at the obvious, but I just want to emphasize you don't want to lose lean body mass.

Dr. Hansen:
Exactly. I'll have people say, "I have seen that work because I lost three pounds last week." And I'll say, "That's all?" If you're doing Keto, right? It'll probably be a little bit more.

Kyle Case:
So you're listening to the Huntsman World Senior Games active life, and we're visiting with Weber State professor of nutrition, Dr. Rodney Hansen. We're talking about the Keto diet and some of the challenges, that the science thrust into all of the social media fervor about how effective that it can be. You've acknowledged that of course, you can lose weight, but you're going about it the wrong way. And maybe even losing the weight that you don't want.

Dr. Hansen:
Exactly. Yeah. You're losing weight, but what people want to lose is lose fat. Usually, they get a little bit too much fat and that's what they want to lose. But that is not what the Keto diet targets.

Jeff Harding:
And not to point out the obvious, but our bodies are made up of both fat and muscle.

Dr. Hansen:
Exactly. Yup.

Jeff Harding:
And the body will use whatever it needs to keep itself alive.

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. But it-

Jeff Harding:
Because it's got the tools that leave the first. But if it doesn't have the tools, it'll use the muscle first.

Dr. Hansen:
It'll use the tools that it needs to use both, I would say. Everything works in what's called in concert. And that's why you have to have a diet that is adequate in protein, adequate in carbohydrate, adequate in fat.

Kyle Case:
So we're using these words adequate.

Dr. Hansen:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
And I'm sure that's the right way. That's a good way to describe it. But basically what you're talking about is just your simple common sense, middle school health class lessons that you learned about how to eat a balanced diet. Right?

Dr. Hansen:
Exactly. Yeah. And at this point, I'll give a quick place for registered dieticians. My wife has one and actively works with that type of counseling to get them to where they need to be. But yes, getting back to your question, a term I've heard a lot is everything in moderation. And it's true. It is. There's a balancing act to everything. I tell my students at Weber State University, that too oftentimes we look at nutrition as black and white. The good guy and the bad guy and everything is a balancing act. Everything is.

Kyle Case:
And you see that especially so often within the social media construct. And Dr. Google or however you want to describe it, you see so many conflicting studies and so much conflicting information, that it can be hard to sort through it all. And decide this is "the truth." Right?

Dr. Hansen:
Exactly.

Kyle Case:
So how do you address that aspect of it? Because I think that's a real frustration that I've experienced and I think others feel the same way. You see one thing that says one thing, you scroll down and you see something that says the exact opposite.

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. And this is where you've got to be discriminating and truly understand what you're looking at. And again, I'm going to fall back on it. We need to listen to the true health experts out there. The dieticians and the scientists that truly have the background to interpret what is going on. A good example of that again, is what we've been talking about. I'll hear people say, 'You can lose weight on the Keto Diet." And you do, but it's not the right weight.

Kyle Case:
It's not what you want.

Dr. Hansen:
Yeah. You want to look at the components of the body, to truly get to what is happening.

Jeff Harding:
I think it's fair to point out that you can have tested were done that determine how much bodyweight is fat and how much bodyweight is muscle.

Dr. Hansen:
Yup.

Jeff Harding:
So you can see what you're losing.

Dr. Hansen:
Yes, exactly. And it's not hard to do. We do it in class.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. And we've seen that and I think that that's an important tool that can be used. Because so many times the tool that we default to, is the bathroom scale.

Dr. Hansen:
Exactly. Yeah. And-

Kyle Case:
And it provides some information, but it's not giving you the whole story.

Dr. Hansen:
Exactly.

Kyle Case:
So we've only got about a minute left to visit with you. I think you've made a pretty good case scientifically. You said you were going to get scientific and you did. [crosstalk 00:22:29] and Latin and everything. That was great. We've talked about this, just this common-sense approach. Just really quickly. What would a good common sense diet look like?

Dr. Hansen:
Good common sense diet? It would have all the nutrients and balance that you need. And we don't have time to go into what those numbers would be.

Kyle Case:
Right.

Dr. Hansen:
Again, I'll give a plug. Listen to a registered dietician when you need your advice. And one other piece of advice I would give that I give to my students as well, we are wired and plumbed to enjoy eating. [crosstalk 00:00:23:05]. When you're not doing it right, when you're doing a restrictive diet and so forth, you're doing it wrong.

Kyle Case:
You're not enjoying it.

Dr. Hansen:
That's not the way that you are designed to be, especially as an athlete. [crosstalk 00:23:17].

Jeff Harding:
I fit that design. I enjoy eating.

Kyle Case:
That's awesome. Well, Dr. Hansen once again, thank you so much for joining us today.

Dr. Hansen:
Well, thank you for having me.

Kyle Case:
Now, you've competed in the Huntsman World Senior Games before, right?

Dr. Hansen:
Well, I want to. It's one of those problems I have, is right when the Huntsman Games are on, is my busiest time of year. But my wife has been very active in it. And as I'm nearing retirement, I plan to be too.

Kyle Case:
Well, keep us on your list for sure.

Dr. Hansen:
It is on my list.

Kyle Case:
Awesome. Well again, thank you for joining us and we'll have to have you come back sometime.

Dr. Hansen:
Thanks.

Kyle Case:
Jeff.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, Kyle.

Kyle Case:
Now is the time.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, because it's getting late in the year.

Kyle Case:
Yes. We're more than halfway through July. That means that it is time to register for the Huntsman World Senior Games. Incidentally, you might find it interesting to know that we have almost 8,000 registered participants right now.

Jeff Harding:
I know it's amazing.

Kyle Case:
Which for this time of year for us is great. We're on track to set a participation record if we keep moving in the direction that we're going.

Jeff Harding:
And you don't want to pass this event, so you better get yourselves registered right now.

Kyle Case:
Now is the time. If you're interested in being a part of the Huntsman World Senior Games and we hope that you're interested in being a part of the Games, get registered, get it on your calendar, use that motivation to help you live the active life. And some of our spots are filling up, so take advantage of the time that you have.

Kyle Case:
It's very easy to register. Just visit seniorgames.net and click on register. The process is simple, it's fast, it's secure and before you know it you'll be ready to become one of the more than 11,000 athletes that we anticipate competing this year.

Jeff Harding:
And if it's not more than.

Kyle Case:
If it's not more than. And the dates for the 2019 Huntsman World Senior Games, are October 7th through the 19th. So you've got a little bit of time, but don't wait too long. Now is the time. Remember to tune in live next to and every Thursday at 5:30 PM mountain time on AM 14.50 or FM 93.1 for the Huntsman World Senior Games. Of course, you can also subscribe to our podcast anywhere the podcasts are found.

Kyle Case:
Once you've subscribed, give us a rating, write a quick review. You can make a difference in helping us spread the word. You can also find this and previous shows right on our website at seniorgames.net which is incidentally where you go to register for the games. One more time, seniorgames.net. check that out. Our inspirational thought for the day Jeff.

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
The struggle you're in today is developing the strength you need for tomorrow.

Jeff Harding:
Closing on truth. Amen.

Kyle Case:
Until next Thursday, stay active. Bye, everyone.