In today’s episode, Kyle and Jeff talk about several things you can start doing right now that might help mitigate the effects and the onset of cognitive decline. Then we visit with Camilla Clawson about how to transition to the next chapter in your life when it’s time. Finding a mentor is step number one. Check it out at our Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life podcast!

 

 

Kyle Case:
singing).

Kyle Case:
Hello and welcome to the Huntsman World, Senior Games Active Life. My name is Kyle Case, and I'll be your host on this amazing journey as we attempt to help you get the most out of your life. Joining me in the studio today is my co-pilot, Jeff Harding. Jeff, how are you doing today?

Jeff Harding:
I'm excited Kyle because we're so close to the games.

Kyle Case:
It is so close.

Jeff Harding:
I can almost taste it, it's so close.

Kyle Case:
Wow. It's close, it's close.

Jeff Harding:
One month away. One month away.

Kyle Case:
But it is exciting. I know-

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
... we're all looking forward to it. The stress level kind of ramps up a little bit-

Jeff Harding:
It does.

Kyle Case:
But also just like that, just that good feeling of, "Hey, it's almost here and we're going to be able to make a difference in people's lives. It's awesome."

Jeff Harding:
So you're feeling the same thing, Kyle? Are you feeling excited?

Kyle Case:
I am feeling excited and the stress level is ramping up a little bit.

Jeff Harding:
I can see it in your face, those wrinkle lines are just getting a little bit more pronounced-

Kyle Case:
Yeah, more pronounced, more pronounced.

Jeff Harding:
... but that'll go away.

Kyle Case:
Well, maybe in January or-

Jeff Harding:
February or March.

Kyle Case:
February or March. Anyway, it's going good. Thank you. So today Jeff.

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
I'm going to do it again.

Jeff Harding:
You talked about stretching or [crosstalk 00:01:06].

Kyle Case:
I'm not talking about stretching, no.

Jeff Harding:
Sleep or-

Kyle Case:
Once was enough about that. Once a decade is enough about stretching. No, we hit it regularly but it's important, and today I'm going to talk about cognitive decline.

Jeff Harding:
Oh, okay.

Kyle Case:
As it relates to Alzheimer's and dementia because here's the thing, Jeff, so many of us are either currently or will be affected by this condition.

Jeff Harding:
What were we talking about Kyle?

Kyle Case:
Yeah, I know exactly. That's exactly what I'm talking about. Whether you're experiencing some of those symptoms yourself or you know you have a loved one who's been affected by it. We're all going to be affected by Alzheimer's and dementia in one way or another end. But there is some good news and that's what I want to talk about today.

Jeff Harding:
Well, let's get somebody good news.

Kyle Case:
Some good news. I want to share five simple steps to cut your risk for dementia. This is according to an article by Charles P. Wallace that I found on mediafeed.org. And the main thing I think, the first thing to understand and to remember and to recognize is that there's no one size fits all program that prevents Alzheimer's or dementia.

Jeff Harding:
No.

Kyle Case:
There isn't. The first and very best thing that you can do is get with your doctor and explore whether you have some of the risk factors and those risk factors include things like being overweight, having high blood sugar or high cholesterol, getting too little exercise or sleep, or eating a poor diet. Those are the risk factors there. Your genes can, of course, play a role as well.

Jeff Harding:
Sure.

Kyle Case:
In determining whether or not you're going to get Alzheimer's, but even that risk factor may not produce what you would consider an inevitable result.

Jeff Harding:
Sure.

Kyle Case:
So, in other words, lifestyle choices make a big difference and I'm going to talk about some lifestyle choices that you could choose that might make a difference.

Jeff Harding:
Okay. I hope they're going to be fun lifestyle choices.

Kyle Case:
They're all good lifestyle choices.

Jeff Harding:
I hope so Kyle.

Kyle Case:
Number one, the thing that you can do, this is the number one thing is hit the gym. Regular exercise is probably the most important move that you can make when it comes to your cognitive health. One surprising finding is that sarcopenia ... Do you know what that is?

Jeff Harding:
I ...

Kyle Case:
You've heard the phrase before?

Jeff Harding:
I've heard the phrase.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, I had heard it too buddy, but I didn't know what it was, but it's the decline in muscle strength-

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
... that often accompanies aging.

Jeff Harding:
I've got it. I've got sarcopenia.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Well, we, I think we're all headed in that direction, right? But they've also found that that can be a severe problem for mental clarity as well. Several studies demonstrate a very strong link between muscle health and brain health, so experts recommend a mix of aerobic as well as anaerobic exercises such as a combination of maybe jogging and weightlifting. Of course Jeff, as always, it's always wise to check with your healthcare professional before you start any new exercise regime. But they're finding that exercise makes a big difference in your cognitive health. Number two, improve your diet.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
Studies seem to support the idea of eating more leafy greens, olive oil, berries, nuts and fish and that we should cut down on the butter.

Jeff Harding:
That's not a problem. I don't have any much butter.

Kyle Case:
You don't eat butter? Okay.

Jeff Harding:
No.

Kyle Case:
Red meats and cheese-

Jeff Harding:
And I do like red meats between [inaudible 00:04:05], but ... And cheese, no cheese, cheese.

Kyle Case:
I know.

Jeff Harding:
We can't cut cheese out.

Kyle Case:
I know.

Jeff Harding:
I love cheese.

Kyle Case:
I know, the other thing we need to look at Jeff, is to check our vitamin D levels. Very low levels have recently been associated with an increased risk of dementia as well-

Jeff Harding:
So get my sun.

Kyle Case:
So get vitamin D. Number three, get a good night's sleep. We've talked about that a lot.

Jeff Harding:
Yes. [crosstalk 00:04:23]

Kyle Case:
We know that's important. Too little sleep is a big risk factor for dementia. While you tend to sleep less as you get older, keeping the bedroom cool and dark and not using those electronics in the hour before bed as well as avoiding caffeine late in the day can help you rest better and rest longer. And issues that can cause chronic lack of sleep and heighten your risk for Alzheimer's such as sleep apnea, a bed partner with a snoring problem, prostate problems for men.

Kyle Case:
All of these are treatable if you get into your doctor and get some help. On the flip side though, and this is the way that it is with health and wellness right.

Jeff Harding:
Sure.

Kyle Case:
On the flip side, recent researchers found that getting too much sleep is also linked to a higher risk of cognitive decline and early death.

Jeff Harding:
Wow.

Kyle Case:
A team of researchers in Japan reported that in a 10-year study, so they were looking at this for a long time-

Jeff Harding:
There's some longevity in this study.

Kyle Case:
They were looking at adults 60 and over. Those who slept 10 hours or more a day were more than twice as likely to develop dementia versus those who slept five to 6.9 hours. So it seems to me, and I'm not a professional, but it seems to me that hitting the sweet spot of six to eight hours a day seems to be the best program.

Kyle Case:
Too much is not good, too little is not good. Six to eight hours seems to be the number.

Jeff Harding:
No, that's funny, my body won't let me stay in the bed for more than seven or eight ... Six or seven hours. I mean, if I ... my body started saying, "Ouch, it hurts, get up, get up, get going."

Kyle Case:
Well, so you're in that range of six to eight-

Jeff Harding:
I'm where it should be. Yep.

Kyle Case:
Two more things quickly. Number four on my five-item list is don't pin all of your hopes on word games.

Jeff Harding:
No.

Kyle Case:
Now, you've heard-

Jeff Harding:
Sudoku or whatever.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Or crossword puzzles. Those can all be good for you. They're not necessarily saying that they're not good for you, but the question is does the research back it up that it's going to help you in the long run. There is some evidence that puzzles, computer use, arts and crafts, music and continuing education may help protect against Alzheimer's. Deeper social connections with the people that we know and love may also help lower the risk of cognitive decline, but this evidence is not as strong as the case for the things that we've already said.

Kyle Case:
Eating well, exercising, losing weight, treating your high blood pressure, lowering your cholesterol, those are going to have a bigger effect than playing Sudoku or crossword puzzles even though those things may help to some degree.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
Finally, this is an interesting one. This is brand new to me. I've never heard this one before but they say that you should sweat it out.

Jeff Harding:
That's not hard for me because I started for spring at 60 degrees to fight exertion.

Kyle Case:
You still had a lot, huh. A 2016 research paper of the Institute of Public Health and Nutrition at the University of Eastern Finland reported that sauna use is inversely associated with dementia and Alzheimer's. In a study of 2,315 men, the study found that the more saunas were taken per week, the lower the risk.

Jeff Harding:
Wow. So [inaudible 00:07:18] to do in Finland, take saunas.

Kyle Case:
Well, that's what I'm going to say. Of course, saunas are a national pastime in Finland. So there may be other factors at play if they're studying the Finnish population.

Jeff Harding:
I think they skewed those statistics on their behalf.

Kyle Case:
They may have, I don't know. And again, there may be other factors that are at play, but they did look at saunas. There seems to be an effect there. The researchers also do caution though that people with heart disease or low blood pressure, excuse me, should avoid saunas because there are some risks to avoid there.

Jeff Harding:
Or you just move to St George in the summertime and you have sun every day.

Kyle Case:
Well, it's a dry heat here, a [inaudible 00:07:50] heat.

Jeff Harding:
A steam room is a wet heat, the sauna is a really dry heat.

Kyle Case:
Oh well, there you go. See, I learn something. I learned two new things today.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
Thank you, Jeff. Thank you. Something to think about. Five things that maybe could make a difference as you're planning for and preparing to have good, strong cognitive health, things to think about. Jeff, today's guest is a personal trainer who teaches group fitness classes. She specializes in dance, fitness and water aerobics. Camilla Clawson spends her workdays at the Intermountain LiVe Well Center. And Camilla, we're excited to welcome you back to the show.

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah. I'm excited to be here again.

Kyle Case:
Thank you for joining us. So we want to talk a little bit about changes that happen in our lives and how to embrace them rather than be fearful of them. And we're talking specifically about some of the physical activities that maybe we've been used to for our whole life long or a certain period of our life. And for whatever reason, whether it's scheduling or health injury, or whatever it is, we're not able to do those things anymore, right?

Camilla Clawson:
Right.

Kyle Case:
So, let's get into it. What does that mean?

Camilla Clawson:
So this is something that I'm no expert on, but I'm living it in real-time in my life.

Kyle Case:
You're experiencing it firsthand.

Camilla Clawson:
I'm experiencing it firsthand. And then also my clients more and more I'm seeing this fear of letting go of things due to injury or just changing chapters in your life and you don't have time for it or whatever. So I've just really been digging into it, how to cope with it myself and then to also help my clients so they can chart these new waters of change. No one likes to change.

Kyle Case:
Right. It's hard.

Camilla Clawson:
It's really hard.

Jeff Harding:
Well, the more we get the more we dislike it.

Camilla Clawson:
Right. Yeah. It's one of those things that you get in that comfort zone. And so to be able to go from a place of fear of letting go to the excitement for something new is the change there that I've had to do myself?

Kyle Case:
That's the key, right. That's the key.

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah. Building-

Kyle Case:
But it's the hard part too.

Camilla Clawson:
It is the hard part because you know if you're ... That fear or that feeling of loss can stick with you for a long time. So to find something else to focus on can be the challenge. So one of the things that I found is being able to, when you realize that you have to let go of something that you love, whether it was a sport or a hobby or just even, we can even talk about it in terms of like profession. Sometimes there are people that like, "I love this job, but there's another opportunity or a room for growth." It's really hard to make these changes.

Camilla Clawson:
So I had to come for myself to find that, what can I ... How can I now redefine myself? Especially if you're doing a sport, you're been a golfer your whole life-

Kyle Case:
Right.

Camilla Clawson:
And then it's like, "You know what? I've had to have back surgery and my body just-

Jeff Harding:
Just not going to work for me.

Camilla Clawson:
Doesn't want to do that. So finding things that you may have wanted to try all your life, but you were like, "Oh, it's too late for me now." So I was like, "Okay, what can I do to build excitement for something that I've loved?" So I've spent the last 10, 11 years doing dance fitness. It was my world. It just was kind of what I built my identity on. Truly, I was like, "This is where my social aspect comes in. Like my friends."

Jeff Harding:
You were the Zumba queen?

Camilla Clawson:
I felt like I was the Zumba queen of my domain.

Jeff Harding:
Well, that's fine. I mean, I didn't say the queen of the world, I said you're the Zumba queen.

Camilla Clawson:
I was the queen of my Zumba world and that was my identity. And so I felt like I was losing a piece of myself having to now this new job opportunity at the Live Well Center, which is fulfilling and you know, expanding my world in a whole different way, but to like the thought of like, "If I give this up, then what?" It is that, okay, now what? Am I just like a working mom that doesn't dance?

Jeff Harding:
Have a passion or-

Camilla Clawson:
Right. So to find something that I was always afraid to do. So I've been trying to find that thing. So I've been helping my clients get out of the fear mode and one of the things is finding a mentor. That's one of the biggest things is finding someone that will help you try something new. Because that's, if you feel like you're alone you can't do it.

Jeff Harding:
So is a mentor that helps, someone that can help you in the transition, help you find something new or help you in the thing you're transitioning too? Or is it all three?

Camilla Clawson:
It can be both and all three. If you can find something if you have that in your mind. I decided that I want to try to run. I always considered myself not to be a good runner and I'm finding that the one thing that people love to talk about the most is themselves.

Camilla Clawson:
And so if you find someone that you admire in that field that you're wanting to explore and just say, "You know, I admire you like this type of athlete," or whatever it is. They will talk your ear off and teach you so much in the process.

Jeff Harding:
If you're just willing to listen.

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah, yeah.

Kyle Case:
That definitely can be the case. You are listening to the Huntsman Worlds Senior Games Active Life, and we're talking with Camilla Clawson who has been a dance instructor and is going through a transition right now to try to sort things out and we're talking about the importance of being able to move on to the next thing for whatever reason it is. You talked about getting a mentor and I think there's so much value in that. Whether you're transitioning or not, there's great value in associating with people who are experts at the thing that you want to be an expert at.

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
So I love that idea of finding a mentor that can help you figure out what the next stage might be. Whether again, like Jeff said, whether that is through the transition process or focusing on the thing that you have now chosen, that will be the next chapter or the next part of your life. I want to ask you a question. All that backs us up just one step before the finding a mentor and that is how do you decide that you're going to need to move on? Like what is that defining moment? I know it's different for other people, but a lot of us do hold on for too long and find ourselves injured or whatever it is.

Kyle Case:
So how do you decide that it's time and then I want to get more into, once you've made that decision, how do you transition?

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah, the thing, the deciding point for me was like, I need to let go of these last few dance fitness classes that I was holding onto. It was a weekly basis thing. I held on for about two years longer than I probably should have emotionally, because I realized that to put the time into it, I was emotionally drained more than physically drained after.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Camilla Clawson:
I realized that the mental strength that I was having to come up with new choreography was draining me. A lot of times that the breaking point is like your rock bottom when you realize that you are too injured to keep continue going or that you're just on burnout. And I just found out that burnout is a real condition now. That's like doctors are saying that it's a real medical condition.

Jeff Harding:
So officially reckoned as a medical condition?

Camilla Clawson:
It's a recognized medical condition.

Jeff Harding:
Wow. That's amazing.

Camilla Clawson:
And so burnout is a real thing. And so oftentimes we just hit that burnout, but you don't have to quit something, but learning to rest, learning to set new boundaries. My turning point was the fact that it wasn't bringing me joy. I just realized that I was going through the motions but it wasn't even filling my cup anymore. I felt empty after.

Kyle Case:
Well, that makes a lot of sense. The hard part is, and this has to be just a personal journey for each individual, but the hard part is, is that to me it seems like there are two things. One is just internally it oftentimes is who you are. It defines your personality, it defines your value and it's something that you've always held on to. It's been your foundation. And again, this could be anything. It could be a sport, it could be a hobby, it could be a profession, whatever it is.

Kyle Case:
But you associate that so firmly with who you are that it's hard to let go. The other thing to is, there is kind of this idea in society that you know, do hard things. You know, even when it gets hard, just keep going after it-

Camilla Clawson:
Keep pushing.

Kyle Case:
Keep going after it, keep pushing. And that makes it difficult as well.

Jeff Harding:
Your parents when you're a child tell you to push through and do hard things. So it's kind of ingrained into us from the time we're young.

Kyle Case:
Well, and our coaches tell us that. And again, you get these motivational posters that are on the wall and all of that stuff kind of allows you to hold on to something may be longer than you need to.

Camilla Clawson:
Also, something along with pushing, sorry to cut you off is comparing. Comparing to other people that are on a different part of their journey. And so you're like, "Well he's my same age or she's doing this, I should be able to do this." When everyone is complete, you cannot-

Jeff Harding:
Everybody's different.

Camilla Clawson:
... compare apples and oranges, yeah.

Kyle Case:
Everybody's different. Everybody's journey is different.

Camilla Clawson:
So to embrace your journey.

Kyle Case:
So I like that. So for you, it was realizing that the joy was not there.

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
Was not filling your cup as you said. For someone else that might be an injury. It might be the pain, it might be scheduling or timing. It could be several things. And again, that ends up having to be a very personal decision. But let's talk about the good news now. Like, if you do have to change whatever that change is, it doesn't have to be the end of joy or excitement.

Camilla Clawson:
No, it's the beginning.

Kyle Case:
It's just the beginning.

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah. So we've all heard what you focus on grows. So if you're focusing on the sadness and the letdown, especially when injury or you feel like maybe it's my age, my body just doesn't want to do the things it was doing 20 years ago. So instead of focusing on like, "Oh my gosh, I'm getting older. Oh my gosh, I can't physically do this anymore." To now change it to gratitude to what you can still do and to change it and tweak it. So to change that, have that paradigm shift from not enough to enough. Like I have what it takes to do this now. Were you going to say something?

Jeff Harding:
As you say, the term that's been thrown around for a while, but it's kind of going away is reinvention. We're kind of reinventing ourselves.

Camilla Clawson:
Right.

Jeff Harding:
And the nice thing is when we're reinventing ourselves, we can reinvent ourselves into whatever we want to reinvent ourselves into.

Camilla Clawson:
And you can do it daily.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
And I like that idea of being grateful for what you still have and what's available and what's left. And if you can focus in on that gratitude, not only can the transition be healthy and exciting and what you want it to be, but there are great health benefits. Just intrinsic benefits of being grateful.

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
Mark Middleton, who is the ... He's kind of the founder of the Growing Bolder Movement. He talks a lot about active aging and being grateful for what is still ahead. Not dismissing some of the challenges that come with aging because we all experience those things, whether it's aches and pains or loss of loved ones, or social life, whatever that happens to be. We will all experience some challenges as we get older and as we age.

Kyle Case:
But there are still so many great things that can be out there and so many great things that can still be done. And so finding that and sparking that excitement and embracing that and getting excited about it. Like you said, "It really can be a beginning. It doesn't have to be an end."

Camilla Clawson:
Yep. It's never too late.

Kyle Case:
I love that. I love that. And you know, that's another thing that we see so much at the Huntsman World Senior Games is that concept of it is never too late. And you know, we're talking a little bit now about having to give up something and moving into something else. And you know, the thing that I think pops into my mind is a sport or whatever, but for some people giving up just a sedentary lifestyle or an attitude of, "Well, I'm too old to run a five K and so I'm just not going to try that." Maybe that's the thing that needs to be given up.

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah, exactly. It's whatever is holding you back and even fear to try something new. I remember going ... Starting a new school in seventh grade and being too afraid to start playing volleyball, because these girls had grown up together and they knew and I held myself back.

Kyle Case:
You missed out on an opportunity.

Camilla Clawson:
I missed out. But if you find that if you jump in, and especially if it's a team thing or a whatever it is, the team will bring you up with them. Everyone on a team wants you to win. But if you find that mentor going back to that, someone who's in the sport or the hobby they want to bring you up too. If they see the passion and you acknowledged their passion and feed their ego maybe just a little bit, they'll help you along the way.

Jeff Harding:
Well then there's another thing, if you do find a mentor who is established in a group, they will probably, as you become friends, they will invite you and make you part of their group. So you have your whole new social-

Camilla Clawson:
Exactly.

Jeff Harding:
... circle as a support group.

Camilla Clawson:
Yep, opens new doors.

Kyle Case:
Which is again, so, so important. And as I mentioned earlier, we see this so often at the games, you know. Some so many athletes come and participate in the Huntsman World Senior Games that have success, whether it's medals or just personal best or whatever it is. That have success at the games that started something new in their 50s or their 60s, or even sometimes their 70s. There are athletes, one in particular, Linda Cohn, who is a track and field athlete.

Kyle Case:
She did not compete in track and field until she was 50 years old, and she's a world record holder now in the javelin. So she went from never having competed before, maybe holding herself back for whatever the reason was. Family, schedules, work, fear, whatever it was. She hits the 50-year-old milestone and says, "Hey, there's these activities that are available for 50 plus athletes out there. I want to try it." And now here she is, several years later, a world record holder in her sport of choice. If that doesn't give you hope, I don't know what will.

Camilla Clawson:
It's incredible.

Kyle Case:
Right? There are so many opportunities.

Camilla Clawson:
You know, Madonna turned 60 last year. I know this is silly to bring up-

Kyle Case:
It's crazy though, hey-

Camilla Clawson:
But Madonna turned 60-

Kyle Case:
Yeah, she turned 60.

Camilla Clawson:
And she's still performing and doing all these things that she did in her 30s, 20s, and 30s. But her fight is to stop pretending age needs to change. Like, don't make age an excuse, just keep showing up how you want to show up every day. And of course, hers is a little bit wilder than you know-

Jeff Harding:
Yes, yes.

Camilla Clawson:
... I's say track and field, but it's the same concept is like, you know ... Age is just the number and you can assign an attitude to that-

Jeff Harding:
Would you ...

Camilla Clawson:
Cher. You can see who I look up to.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah. Cher too. Say Cher is, I mean she's in her 70s, she's doing movies and ...

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah, so she's 73-

Jeff Harding:
Still performs. It's the same.

Camilla Clawson:
So, she's 73, still performs. Changes costume 12 times, wear platforms and headdresses that are 12 feet tall. Like so. And she's been documented to have done a plank for five minutes.

Jeff Harding:
Wow. That's impressive.

Kyle Case:
I can respect that. I just did a two-minute plank today and that was all I had. I felt pretty good about it. But now, you know, I'm not going to compare.

Jeff Harding:
Don't compare, don't compare.

Camilla Clawson:
Don't compare.

Kyle Case:
I'm not going to get into that.

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah, love it.

Kyle Case:
Camilla, I appreciate what you said. We only got about 30 seconds. Anything else that you just want to add to this concept?

Camilla Clawson:
Yeah. Gratitude is the key to happiness in my life. So anytime you can be grateful for what you had, the adventures you had, what you have now, and gratitude for the day is, it'll change your life.

Jeff Harding:
That's great.

Kyle Case:
I love it. Having an attitude of gratitude truly will take you so much further than having a pessimistic outlook. So again Camilla, thank you so much for joining us.

Camilla Clawson:
Thanks for having me.

Kyle Case:
And hopefully, we can have you back some time.

Camilla Clawson:
Hope so, thanks.

Kyle Case:
Jeff.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, Kyle?

Kyle Case:
Registration-

Jeff Harding:
... is crazy, it's closed.

Kyle Case:
Is officially closed, right. Officially closed for the Huntsman Senior World Games. But don't despair.

Jeff Harding:
No.

Kyle Case:
You can still get involved in the Huntsman World Senior games-

Jeff Harding:
And then probably even have more fun because it doesn't cost anything.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. And you can register as a volunteer.

Jeff Harding:
I mean, you're going there, yeah.

Kyle Case:
I know you knew that. Jeff is over the volunteers at the games and so he takes a lot of pride and also a lot of interest in how we're doing it. It takes about 3,000 volunteers to pull the Huntsman World Senior Games off and man, it's easy to become a volunteer and to be-

Jeff Harding:
It is.

Kyle Case:
... and to be, make a difference at the Huntsman World Senior Games. All you got to do is visit seniorgames.net. Click on the register tab. It's very easy to register as a volunteer. There are tons of volunteer opportunities that include helping with the sports as well as helping in non-sport areas. If you don't feel like sports are your thing, there are tons of benefits to volunteering as well.

Kyle Case:
Health benefits and we could use your help. So hit seniorgames.net and register to volunteer today. Any specific area that stands out as a need right now, Jeff?

Jeff Harding:
Well, there's no specific area, but there are some areas that do need a lot of help like I know that somebody just put on a need for some feather flag ... Excuse me, some butterfly flag dancers for the opening ceremony.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, so there are opportunities too-

Jeff Harding:
To dance.

Kyle Case:
To participate there. There's ways to help out at track and field and the triathlon.

Jeff Harding:
Refreshments.

Kyle Case:
Refreshments, delivery, all kinds of ways to get involved.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
Speaking of the opening ceremonies, I want to put a quick plug-in for the ceremonies. It takes place at Trailblazer Stadium at Dixie State University. It's going to be on Tuesday, October 8th. The Gates open at 6:00 PM and the show starts at 7:00 PM and what a show Jeff.

Jeff Harding:
It is, it is.

Kyle Case:
We're going to have singing and dancing, a motivational speech by three-time Olympic gold medalist, Leah Amico. And don't forget the fireworks. You can get more information on that at seniorgames.net. Remember to tune in live next to and every Thursday at 5:30 PM mountain time on AM 1450 or FM 93.1 for the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life.

Kyle Case:
(singing).

Kyle Case:
And of course, you can subscribe for a podcast anywhere that podcasts are found.

Kyle Case:
Our inspirational thought for the day Jeff. Great things never come from comfort zones.

Jeff Harding:
That is so true.

Kyle Case:
Until next Thursday. Stay active. Bye, everyone.