Today Kyle and Lil talk about sleep deprivation, what it is and more importantly how to get more and better sleep. If you’ve ever felt sleep deprived, this might be the episode for you. We also visit with best-selling author, motivational speaker, and Huntsman World Senior Games athlete Richard Eyre. He shares some golden nuggets on active aging and truly getting the most out of the “autumn of life.” This is a great show. Check it out at our Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life podcast!

Friends of the Huntsman World Senior Games can receive a 40% discount on any of the books Richard talked about on the podcast! Get the discount now by entering the access code "huntsmanfriend".

 

Kyle Case:
Hello, and welcome to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. My name is Kyle Case, and I'll be your host on this amazing journey as we attempt to help you get the most out of your life. Joining me in the studio today, filling in for Jeff Harding, who is training a group of key volunteers for the Huntsman World Senior Games right now is my good friend, Lil Barron.

Lil Barron:
Yes, Mr. Kyle Case.

Kyle Case:
How are you doing today?

Lil Barron:
I'm great. How are you?

Kyle Case:
I'm doing good. The games are close.

Lil Barron:
I know. I'm so scared.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, it's exciting. Right? Yeah.

Lil Barron:
It is so exciting.

Kyle Case:
But so many logistics and so many details, and we've-

Lil Barron:
Oh, I had no idea.

Kyle Case:
We've been working hard at it and it looks like, really from every angle, it looks like it's just going to be a fantastic year.

Lil Barron:
Absolutely.

Kyle Case:
A great number of athletes. The logistics are coming together. The venues are on the schedule, and it's just going to be good.

Lil Barron:
My sponsors are incredible.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Lou is our director of sponsor relations, and so she gets a chance to reach out to those who helped make the event happen from a financial support standpoint. And it's going to be great.

Lil Barron:
It is.

Kyle Case:
It's going to be awesome.

Lil Barron:
I'm so excited.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Yeah. Good stuff. So Lil, you know, on the show we always do a little introduction, and we try to talk about some kind of irrelevant health and wellness issue or item, a topic. One that we regularly kind of focus on is the importance of sleep.

Lil Barron:
Oh.

Kyle Case:
And it's so important.

Lil Barron:
It's so important.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, especially during this time of year for us who are working on the games. But I found this intro, I found this article. I thought of you because I know you haven't been feeling great the last little while.

Lil Barron:
No, I haven't.

Kyle Case:
And unfortunately, that has led to some poor sleep.

Lil Barron:
Yes, it has.

Kyle Case:
And so today I want to talk a little bit about sleep deprivation.

Lil Barron:
Oh great.

Kyle Case:
Is that okay?

Lil Barron:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Maybe we'll learn something here.

Lil Barron:
Yes, and I can sleep well tonight.

Kyle Case:
I hope, but I'm not sure if this will lead to better sleep or not, but I hope that it might. But the fact of the matter is, is that becoming sleep deprived, as they call it, is pretty easy. One in five Americans fits that bill at any given time. So a lot of us are sleep deprived. And all it takes is just one bad night of sleep, and then all of a sudden you're sleep-deprived. Right? So it really can happen to any of us, and it can happen for a lot of different reasons. The experts say that most people need to sleep between seven and nine hours a night. That's according to Dr. Rizan Hajal who is a sleep specialist with the Sioux Falls Sleep Center.

Kyle Case:
But the thing is, is that it's not just the time that we spend asleep, it's also the quality of the sleep as well. For example, you can get eight hours of sleep, but still be sleep deprived if you don't fall into that restorative REM sleep that we hear about because of some kind of a disorder, maybe sleep apnea or something else like that. So you can be in bed and sleeping, but not get that a full benefit of a good night's sleep. Some of the signs, Lil, that might tell you that you're sleep-deprived, you might recognize a few of these. One of them is that you feel like you have to catch up on sleep during the weekend.

Lil Barron:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
That's an indicator that maybe you're sleep-deprived. Experts say that you should naturally wake up at about the same time, even on Saturdays and Sundays without an alarm clock. If you don't, you're probably sleep-deprived. So there's a warning sign for you. Another one warning sign is that you conk out within five minutes of going to bed.

Lil Barron:
Oh.

Kyle Case:
Does that ever happen to you?

Lil Barron:
Every night.

Kyle Case:
Every night? Yeah. So a lot of people think it's a good thing to fall asleep quickly, but the fact of the matter is that it probably means, or it could be an indicator that you're just not getting enough sleep. And then another thing is falling asleep during the day. That's another bad sign that you may be sleep-deprived.

Lil Barron:
Did you hear me yesterday, or what?

Kyle Case:
I'm not going to confirm or deny the sound of storing from your office. No, unfortunately, sleep deprivation does more than just kind of dial-up your need for a good caffeinated beverage. The effects of sleep deprivation can be subtle. Your productivity oftentimes will go down. You can easily become short with people, even people that you don't mean to be short with.

Lil Barron:
That you love, those kinds? Yeah, yeah.

Kyle Case:
Those kinds of people. Oftentimes, it leads to memory problems. You can't remember things. And if it happens for months on end, which, yeah, some of us are struggling with that. It can also lead to anxiety and depression. So there are some real things there.

Lil Barron:
Oh, wow!

Kyle Case:
Also, we've talked on the show several times about how the brain cleanses itself during REM sleep, and so if we're not getting that sleep, there are those health detriments. Also, sleep deprivation is linked to other things including heart disease, obesity, diabetes. It can also increase the risk of stroke. So sleep's important.

Lil Barron:
Wow!

Kyle Case:
We need to get some sleep.

Lil Barron:
Well, so what's the difference between REM and deep sleep?

Kyle Case:
So I think they're ... I mean I'm not asleep expert, but I think that when people say deep sleep that they're talking about REM sleep.

Lil Barron:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
REM is the random eye movement that means that you're fully asleep, your deepest sleep. Your eyes do move back and forth. That's why they call it rapid eye movement. Usually, that's when dreams happen. That's what REM sleep is. I want to share just a couple of tips on ways that we can get over sleep deprivation. The only way, there's only one way and that is to get a good night's sleep.

Lil Barron:
I was going to say ...

Kyle Case:
We've got to get enough sleep, but since that's not always the easiest thing to do, let me share just a couple of tips that can maybe help us get a better night's sleep. For starters, it's a good idea to take a look at your bedroom, if it's cool, and dark, and quiet. If any of those things are out of line, it might be hard to get a good night's sleep. Are you a cool sleeper, or do you like to sleep when it's warm?

Lil Barron:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Lil Barron:
I have to have it cool.

Kyle Case:
I think most of us prefer that it's cool. Dark and quiet, of course, help as well. It's important. We talk a lot about being active and having exercise as a part of our lives, but exercising too late can sometimes make it hard for us to go to sleep.

Lil Barron:
That's why I don't do it.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, hitting the gym too late at night, it makes it hard to doze off sometimes. Experts say that you might want to pass on the nightcap, you know, pass on that alcoholic beverage. They say having wine with dinner is probably fine, but if you want your body to, excuse me, you do want your body to metabolize that alcohol, which takes about an hour per serving before you hit the hay. Sometimes that can lead to sleep deprivation. And then finally, limit your caffeine to the morning and only the morning. They say that caffeine takes a full 24 hours to work fully out of your system.

Lil Barron:
Really?

Kyle Case:
So if you're drinking, you know, a caffeinated beverage, whether that's coffee or a Coca-Cola, or whatever it is, after 2:00 PM, it might seem like that's a long way from bedtime, but it's probably affecting the way that you're sleeping.

Lil Barron:
Wow!

Kyle Case:
And then I said that was the last one, let me just throw one more bonus one in there. And that is, do your very best to try to stick to the same bedtime and waking time, which again, not always easy to do, but if you can do that throughout the week, even on the weekends, you're going to find yourself having better quality of sleep, which is what it's all about.

Lil Barron:
Yes. That's what it's all about.

Kyle Case:
Are any of those things going to help you tonight sleep a little bit better, Lil?

Lil Barron:
Yeah, I'm going to stop the caffeinated drink after 2:00.

Kyle Case:
Okay. Okay. Well, you know, we're trying to make the world a better place one good night at a time.

Lil Barron:
That's right.

Kyle Case:
Lil, today's guest is a long-time athlete at the Huntsman World Senior Sames. He's a Harvard MBA, a very popular speaker, and also a best-selling author. We're very pleased to welcome Richard Eyre to the show. Richard, how are you doing today?

Richard Eyre:
I'm good. It's nice to be with you, and I almost fell asleep during the early part of the show because I was so sleep-deprived.

Kyle Case:
It happens to the best of us, doesn't it? It happens to the best. Well, Richard, we're excited to visit you. You've been on the show before, and looking forward to catching up on how things are going with you. Now, I introduced you as a long-time athlete at the Huntsman World Senior Games. I know that that's been the case. How many years have you competed in the games?

Richard Eyre:
Well, that's why I was glad to join you today. You know, I first showed up down there. I'll tell you the quick story. We have some property in New Harmony just up the road by the Kolob Canyon, and we would always be down there riding our horses in the fall. And one year, the year I turned 55, I just happened to hear about the senior games. So I drove on down the black cliff and got to St. George and entered. And I entered tennis, and track, and basketball, and we did pretty well in those. And I kind of got addicted and, believe it or not, I have now, this year when I show up at the games will be my 21st consecutive year.

Lil Barron:
Wow!

Kyle Case:
Wow. Richard, that's amazing.

Richard Eyre:
I haven't missed a single year off, which is surprising to me because we travel a lot. We have book tours and are speaking and so on, but for some lucky reason, and partly our scheduling, we make it a point never to be gone that second week in October because we want to be right there in St. George.

Kyle Case:
Well, that is amazing. And I know you do have a busy schedule, and thanks for sticking with us. You've seen a lot of changes, and a lot of growth, and a lot of different things at the games, and that's awesome. We love that our athletes do find that kind of a second home in the games and a second family in a lot of cases.

Richard Eyre:
Right.

Lil Barron:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
And I'm glad that you've been able to experience that. And 21 years! Congratulations!

Lil Barron:
Wow! Yeah, that's amazing.

Richard Eyre:
Well, and it becomes almost like a reunion. There are certain people, the only time I see him is at the senior games, and I see him every year. I don't think I'm unique in the fact that I pretty much go every year. I think a lot of people do that. I know, especially in the tennis tournament part of it, I run into the same people year after year.

Richard Eyre:
And it's kind of fun in tennis because, you know, we've been fortunate. We've won the gold medal of the last three or four years in doubles, and I'd won it earlier in singles, but a couple of guys came along that could beat me, and they beat every year in the final or the semifinal. And it's kind of like a war of attrition. I'm going to outlast them. They're going to quit playing or die, and I'm going to still be there and then I'll be able to win the gold again.

Kyle Case:
If you can't outplay them outlast them, right? That's the way it works. Well, that's awesome. That is awesome. You mentioned a lot of our athletes, you know, just exhibit that high level of loyalty. And we're so grateful for that, and not only just because they're a part of the games, but because they become friends over the years. And we love to interact with them. But we do have a program that we call The Endurance Program, and we award athletes who have competed for 15 years at the games a nice commemorative ring. And those who have competed for-

Richard Eyre:
Yes. I got a watch-

Kyle Case:
Yeah, for 20 years.

Richard Eyre:
... in my 15th year. Yeah.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Yeah. For your 20th year, you got the watch, and you're working your way-

Richard Eyre:
Oh, that was the watch, that's right.

Kyle Case:
... working your way towards the next level.

Richard Eyre:
That's right.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Richard Eyre:
Pretty soon I'll have jewelry for my whole body. When do I get my nose ring? I want my nose ring.

Kyle Case:
We're looking at that. That's under consideration for 35 years. We haven't decided for sure, but it's on our list.

Richard Eyre:
There you go.

Kyle Case:
Well, Richard, you mentioned one of the great things about the games that have drawn you to the event and that is that family reunion aspect. And so many people, you're not alone, so many people feel that draw, and that connection, and the social part. Of course, the competition is important, but that social part of interacting and finding friends, making new friends, renewing and strengthening those old relationships that you've made over the years, that's a huge part of the Huntsman World Senior Games and one that you've enjoyed.

Richard Eyre:
Well, you know, and I'll say that, I'm just being real candid, when I first came down 21 years ago, I chuckled a little bit at the name, the Huntsman World Games because it was a little more of a local event in those days. But nowadays, I tell you what, the games have grown into its name because I do meet people from all over the world. And I find that especially true in the track events. I'll just be a little personal, I used to be able to win the triple jump every year with relative ease.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Richard Eyre:
Partly because I'm a tall guy. I've got long legs, and I'm lucky enough that my knees are still good. I could never win the broad jump. I could always win the triple jump, you know, because it gave me more steps, and I've got these long legs. But then, you know, you'll remember this. Just a little while ago as the games expanded and got bigger and bigger, and I started getting into the track, and I see Jamaicans and I see-

Kyle Case:
Barbados

Richard Eyre:
I see a lot of people from Barbados.

Kyle Case:
Trinidad and Tobago.

Richard Eyre:
And I'm telling you what, I want to see those guys' birth certificates because they can sure jump a long way for their age.

Kyle Case:
For sure. For sure.

Richard Eyre:
And so I've loved seeing the games expand and become more and more global. That's what makes it fun. And when you go to the opening ceremony, you see all those flags, you realize this is a world event.

Lil Barron:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
This year, we will host our 81st nation at the Huntsman World Senior Games.

Richard Eyre:
Wow! That's amazing.

Kyle Case:
The Cayman Islands are brand new this year. So, you know, as you said, when we started, I think there were big dreams and big ambitions. And we've certainly, over the past three, almost three and a half decades, been able to grow into that name. And it's something that we're so excited to be a part of and something we feel very strongly about.

Richard Eyre:
Yeah, you should be. And, you know, and John Morgan is a good friend of mine for so many years.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, John's our founder

Richard Eyre:
And I used to kid him. I'd say, "John, why don't you just call it the Huntsman Utah Games?" And he said, "No, no. You wait to see, we're going to grow this thing." Eighty-one countries, that's awesome. You know, with our writing and speaking, as I said, we travel extensively, and we've been to over a hundred countries in our work. And I think before long there will be more people. I can quit traveling and just go to the games, and I'll see people from more countries than I've traveled to.

Kyle Case:
Well, we hope so. We hope so. Let's transition to that just a little bit, Richard. You are a bestselling author. You've done a lot of speaking, obviously all around the world, as you just said. A lot of your books focus on families and relationships, but also on active aging and how to a grandparent. Talk a little bit about the books that you think might speak the most as a resource for athletes at the Huntsman World Senior Games.

Richard Eyre:
Sure. Well, you know, what a lot of authors do, and it's a natural thing, you tend to write about the life phase or the experience that you're having currently. Right?

Kyle Case:
Right.

Richard Eyre:
I mean, the best parenting books we've written, and including our best sellers, were written while we were parenting. I meanwhile we was in the thick of it because you can write about it with a certain reality. And you know, we continued to write those parenting books for several years. And then a few years back, Linda, my wife and I, we co-author books together. And she looked at me and she said, "You know, we're too old to write about this now. We need to write about what we're living. And we are grandparents now, and we love being grandparents. And let's quit writing about parenting. And start writing by grandparenting."

Richard Eyre:
And that's what we did. And, you know, we had written a lot of books on work-life balance, and on people trying to succeed in business and their careers, and at the same time keep their lives balanced and do a good job with their families, and their marriages, and so on. And that part of it has evolved too where we'd written books called Life Planning, and Life Balance, and so on. And then we got to a stage where what we wanted to write was, we ended up calling it Life in Full. And it's a book about the autumn of life. We like to call it the autumn of life, not the winter you understand.

Kyle Case:
Right, right. You're not there.

Richard Eyre:
We're not ready to be in the winter yet, but we love autumn. And so it's basically ... I'd probably list and answer your question, there are probably five books that would be relevant to people who come to the games. And the first one would be Life in Full because it's really about the whole sweep of life and how it changes as you become older. And we flip around a lot of metaphors, you know, like as you get older you hate to hear people say, "Well he's over the hill." Well actually, where would you rather be than over the hill? Think of yourself as a cyclist. You finally crest, and now you can coast a little, and you can go faster than ever because you're over the hill.

Kyle Case:
I love that.

Richard Eyre:
It's a book about making that autumn the real crescendo of your life. And then you mentioned the grandparenting books. Linda and I have always loved co-authoring books. We were starting to write a book on grandparenting, and the further into it we got, the more we realized we needed a book for grandparents, not in general, but one for grandpas and one for grandmas because they're very different roles. It probably won't surprise you, you particularly, Lil, because you know this, the grandmothering book is a big thick book with lots of illustrations, and even recipes are in this book.

Lil Barron:
And I was just going to say cookies.

Richard Eyre:
And my grandfathering book, it's like bullet points. It's like a pamphlet because I know grandpa's attention span is shorter and they want a briefing rather than a book. So we had a lot of fun with those two. And then our latest one, probably the last one I'll mention, is a brand new book that we call The Eight Myths of Marriage. We'd never written a book on marriage. With all the books we've done on family and parenting, we'd never done one on marriage. Our publisher kept saying, "Hey, we want a book on marriage." And we're like "Well, we'll let you know when we figure it out."

Kyle Case:
Once we figured it out, we'll get right on that, huh?

Richard Eyre:
So we finally ... It was kind of fun guys because it released right on the day of our 50th anniversary.

Lil Barron:
Aw. That's so nice.

Kyle Case:
Congratulations.

Richard Eyre:
The preface to the book says, "Hey, it took us 50 years to figure it out. Let us tell you what we learned and maybe you can figure it out a little sooner."

Kyle Case:
I love that. I love it. Well, congratulations on 50 amazing and wonderful years of marriage as well. How great is that?

Lil Barron:
That is awesome.

Kyle Case:
Where can people find these books?

Richard Eyre:
Well, the good news on that is that Linda, who's had a bad knee for years and hasn't been able to participate in the game, just got a knee replacement.

Kyle Case:
Oh, good for her.

Lil Barron:
Oh.

Richard Eyre:
And she won't be ready this year, but by the games in 2020, we'll have another Eyre down there competing.

Kyle Case:
Perfect. That's perfect.

Lil Barron:
Very nice.

Kyle Case:
Richard, where can people find these books?

Richard Eyre:
You know, I'm going to give you a ... What I usually say to that question is just find them in a bookstore, find them on Amazon because they're in all the stores now and Amazon. But I thought about this before our call today, if your listeners want to go to a website called familius.com, that's F-A-M-I-L-I-U-S, they will find that we have a special offer on there that you need an access code for. And the access code is going to be Huntsman Friend. That's just special for your listeners. And if they put in Huntsman Friend, that'll open a page where they can get any of our books for 40% off. That's our price as authors. We get books for 40% off. We want to pass that along. Anyone that's going with the senior games is a friend of ours.

Kyle Case:
That's fantastic. Is it case-sensitive? Do they need to be all lowercase or ...

Richard Eyre:
No. Either one is fine, familius.com and then you'll find them and hire author, but it takes that access code to get into it. Do you know what I'll do? Do you have a website with your show? I can send you a direct link with that page.

Kyle Case:
We do, yes, we do

Richard Eyre:
Well, as soon as we hang up, I'll send you a link and you can just put it right on.

Kyle Case:
Thanks, Richard. We'll do that.

Lil Barron:
Yeah, that's so nice. Thank you.

Kyle Case:
What a great offer. Thank you so much. Valuable, valuable information, great insights from Linda and Richard Eyre, some incredible books that they've written sharing their life experience. And I love this concept that you've just talked about, the autumn of our lives.

Lil Barron:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
And, you know, we feel, obviously, so strongly about that as well, and we love being a part of the autumn of people's lives. What're some of the things ... Let's move back to sports for just a second because I know that's been a big part of your life as well. What's one of the things that you think the sport has taught you throughout your life experience of competing as an athlete?

Richard Eyre:
Well, that's a great question and let me just lead into it with another comment on the autumn. As we talk, we live in Park City, and I'm sitting here looking out at this canyon, and this hillside, and the aspens, just today. Yesterday, I didn't notice it much. And just today they're getting yellow, and it's just gorgeous looking out at them. And I'm thinking that I've never met a person that didn't love the autumn-

Kyle Case:
The fall colors. Yeah.

Richard Eyre:
And I feel sorry for people who, you know ... We've got a son that lives in Hawaii. It's hard to feel sorry for him living in Maui, but in a way I do because he doesn't experience changing seasons. And there is something about the renewal of the season that is wonderful. And, you know, we don't call it golden for anything. I mean, I'm looking out right now at a golden landscape. And I think what we all have to understand is that ... And you know, I don't mean to make this into a botany lesson, but they tell us that what we're seeing now is the real color of the leaves. You know, it's the chlorophyll that's on during the summer that makes them green, but their real color is what you see in the fall.

Richard Eyre:
And I think in a way that's how life is. Do you know? We go through a lot of years that spring and summer are wonderful. You know, they're productive times. We're raising our children. We're pursuing our careers, and it's great. But I think you reach your reality in the autumn. That's who you are. That's who you've become all through your life.

Kyle Case:
What a beautiful concept.

Lil Barron:
Very nice.

Richard Eyre:
And I think we need to celebrate that more because we live in a country and in a culture where a lot of people who are older feel like they're being put out to pasture. Do you know? Which, by the way, is another metaphor you can turn around. Believe me, I'm a horse guy. If you're a horse, there's nothing better than being put out to pasture. That's where you want to be.

Kyle Case:
Absolutely.

Richard Eyre:
And I think that's how it is. But to your question about competing, I don't think competition is an end in itself. I mean, you know, there are some bad aspects to competition, but the good thing about it, as a means to an end, it's the competition that keeps you going and what fuels you. And if you want to test that on yourself, go out in the backyard and play catch with your daughter or your son for a while, and then try to do the same thing, but eliminate the balls where you're just going through the motions of throwing and catching. You're instantly tired, and you don't have endurance, or it loses its fun.

Richard Eyre:
And the thing about competing is it fuels you. Do you know? It causes you to do your best and to become better and better. A final thought that I have, I'm mainly at tennis, is my ... There's a lot of sports you can play all your life. And what Huntsman Games does, it shows you can play probably play any sport all your life.

Kyle Case:
Right.

Richard Eyre:
Even basketball, which is thought of as a young man's sport. Tennis though is thought of as the one you can go to all your life, and so I wrote a book called Tennis and Life, which is a metaphor for life. And the thing that's interesting to me is using that to comment about what we were just talking about. Someone said to me the other day, "Isn't it unfortunate that Roger Federer, and Rafael Nadal, and Novak Djokovic all came along at the same time because they compete with each other so that each won like 16 or 20 titles. If it had only been one of them, they might have won 60 titles."

Kyle Case:
Might've won them all. Yeah.

Richard Eyre:
And I said, "No, no, no, you've got it wrong. I beg to differ. The reason that those three are the greatest of all time is each other. They have made each other better by the competition between the three of them." And that's what I think happens with the competition.

Kyle Case:
Oh, I love that Richard.

Richard Eyre:
What happens with the competition is you get better and better because you test yourself every day.

Kyle Case:
For sure.

Richard Eyre:
And that's why the games are great.

Kyle Case:
Absolutely.

Richard Eyre:
On the other hand, if you don't win, if you come home without a medal, that's not the point. The point is you competed and hopefully, you did better. I ran into one guy, I'll just end with this. I ran into one guy who said last year to me, "I didn't win any medals, but I beat myself in all three of the events I entered." And I said, "You know if you're getting a year older but doing better than when you were one year younger, you're a big winner."

Kyle Case:
You've won already. That is perfect and a perfect conclusion to this concept and this idea, Richard. Unfortunately, that's all the time that we've got to visit, but hopefully, we can have you back on the show another time.

Richard Eyre:
Absolutely. Well, good luck to both of you, and keep, keep it going down there. Make it bigger and better.

Kyle Case:
That's our goal, and we look forward to seeing you here in just a-

Lil Barron:
Yes, we do.

Kyle Case:
... a couple of weeks. Thanks, Richard

Richard Eyre:
Alright. You too. See you soon. Take care.

Kyle Case:
Take care. So, Lil?

Lil Barron:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Registration is closed for the games.

Lil Barron:
Yes, it is.

Kyle Case:
But you can still get involved.

Lil Barron:
Yes, you can.

Kyle Case:
You can still get involved. You can register as a volunteer. There's a lot of ways to volunteer at the games. All you've got to do is visit seniorgames.net, click on volunteer. You can search for the event. You can search by day. And there are tons of opportunities to get involved. It takes about 3,000 volunteers to make the games happen. So check that out, Seniorgames.net.

Kyle Case:
I also want to put in a very quick plug for our opening ceremonies. It Takes place at Trailblazer Stadium at Dixie State University. It's on Tuesday, October 8th. The Gates open at 6:00 PM, and the show starts at 7:00. And it is an amazing show.

Lil Barron:
It is.

Kyle Case:
For additional information. You can once again visit seniorgames.net. Remember to tune in living next to and every Thursday at 5:30 PM mountain time on AM 1450 or FM 93.1 for the Huntsman World Senior Games active life. And, of course, you can always subscribe to our podcast pretty much anywhere that podcasts are found. Lil, our inspirational thought for the day comes from Olympic and world champion Jordan Burroughs. He says, "No victory can define me, and no defeat can define me. I am who I am when I enter the arena, and I remain the same man when I exit."

Lil Barron:
Nice.

Kyle Case:
Until next Thursday, stay active.