September 23 is the autumnal equinox, the first day of autumn. To commemorate, Kyle and Jeff talk about ways to prevent falls, including being a senior athlete. We also visit with Donna Ingle, a long-time competitive cyclist, and national record holder. She's been competing in the Huntsman World Senior Games for 13 years and has some great memories to share. Give it a listen to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life podcast!

 

Kyle Case:
Hello, and welcome to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. My name is Kyle Case, and I'll be your host on this amazing journey as we attempt to help you get the most out of your life. Joining me in the studio today is my copilot, Jeff Harding. Jeff, how are you doing today?

Jeff Harding:
I'm doing well. I would say I'm overwhelmed but I'm not overwhelmed. But I'm whelmed.

Kyle Case:
You're whelmed. Not underwhelmed, not overwhelmed.

Jeff Harding:
I'm just whelmed.

Kyle Case:
You're just whelmed. Well, that seems like a pretty good place to be.

Jeff Harding:
It is. I mean the games are coming up. We're just getting crazy in the office busy. But I'm not quite overwhelmed yet, but it could go there at any time.

Kyle Case:
At any moment, it could shift over, right?

Jeff Harding:
And how are you doing Kyle?

Kyle Case:
I'm doing good. You know, as you said, we're getting busy, we're getting ready for the games. But this is the time of year that we anticipate and just a lot of details that need to come together.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
But they seem to be falling into place.

Jeff Harding:
They do.

Kyle Case:
And we are very excited about the games coming.

Jeff Harding:
We are. It's going to be a great year.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Speaking about exciting things, Jeff, does the date Monday, September 23rd mean anything at all to you?

Jeff Harding:
Let's see, it's a week after my brother's birthday, so not really.

Kyle Case:
So it doesn't ring any bells, nothing?

Jeff Harding:
September 23rd.

Kyle Case:
It's not your wedding anniversary.

Jeff Harding:
Not mine, no. Is it yours?

Kyle Case:
Okay. I'm not fishing for that. I just thought I would double-check.

Jeff Harding:
Mine's in March, so I know that.

Kyle Case:
It's not mine either, no. It's, Jeff, it's the autumnal equinox.

Jeff Harding:
Oh, duh.

Kyle Case:
Well, yeah, like of course you should've known that, right?

Jeff Harding:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
No, I'm just kidding. It is the autumnal equinox, I'm not kidding about that. But the fact that you didn't know it, it's not that big of a deal. See, it's the first day of autumn though.

Jeff Harding:
I should've known that because I was married on March 20th which is the first day of spring, so I should've known.

Kyle Case:
Well, you might've put those together, although that's a little bit of a stretch to me astronomically.

Jeff Harding:
Six months apart, you know?

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Anyway, it's the first day of autumn and it happens to also be the day that we celebrate... Not celebrate, we commemorate Fall Prevention Day.

Jeff Harding:
Because it's the first day of fall.

Kyle Case:
Fall. You get it, right?

Jeff Harding:
I picked right up on that.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, fun little play on words there. So in honor of that, Fall Prevention Day, on Monday, September 23rd which is coming right up, I want to talk just a little bit about falls, particularly in the senior population.

Jeff Harding:
Probably how to avoid them.

Kyle Case:
Well, I want to talk about that as well, but I want to share some statistics first.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
And frankly, Jeff, some of these statistics are kind of sobering.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah, they are.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, a little bit overwhelming. So let me share just a couple of things.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
Then I do want to talk about how to avoid falls.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
Number one, listen to this, an older adult falls every second of every day in the United States.

Jeff Harding:
Well, that person spends a lot of time getting back up, don't they?

Kyle Case:
And quickly.

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
And quickly, yeah. So it's not, yeah...

Jeff Harding:
I gotcha, Kyle. I gotcha.

Kyle Case:
Okay, I just want to make sure we're understanding each other.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah, it's not the same person falling but an individual is falling every second of every day. Okay.

Kyle Case:
When it comes right down to it. Falls affect all of us. Whether it's us personally that's fallen down or someone that we know and love and cares about, it's a big deal.

Jeff Harding:
Oh yeah. Sure.

Kyle Case:
They found that one in four older adults report a fall in any given year, even though they estimate that falls are going to be much higher than that because not everyone reports a fall, right?

Jeff Harding:
Nope.

Kyle Case:
But one in four is pretty high.

Jeff Harding:
That is.

Kyle Case:
That's an of people. They found that more than 27,000 older adults died as the result of a fall.

Jeff Harding:
That's pretty sad.

Kyle Case:
Which are 74 older adults every single day that is passing away because of a fall? Among older Americans, falls are the number one cause of death from injury, and it's also the number one cause of just injuries period in older adults, older Americans.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
So a lot going on there in the fall area. And unfortunately, and this makes a lot of sense, but unfortunately falls increase with age.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, they do.

Kyle Case:
So percentages of older adults who reported a fall, 27% of 65 to 74-year-olds reported a fall, but 30% of the 75 to 84-year-old group reported a fall. And then that goes up to 37% of 85+ adults are reporting a fall in a year. So kind of a big deal, right?

Jeff Harding:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
Something that does, as I said, affects all of us. But the thing is is that falls don't have to be just a normal part of getting older. There are some things that we can do that can help prevent, and some of them are quite simple. So I want to talk about those things.

Jeff Harding:
Let's do it.

Kyle Case:
Number one, they recommend that you just speak up. And, in other words, you need to talk openly with your doctor about fall risks as well as prevention of the falls. You should tell your doctor right away if you have fallen or if you're afraid that you might fall. If you feel unsteady, let your doctor know about that. You want to work together with your doctor to review all of your medications and discuss any side effects, like feeling dizzy or sleepy, that can lead to a fall.

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
And then also see if taking a vitamin D supplement for improved bone muscle and nerve health might be right for you. So get with your doctor, that's one of the first things that you can do.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah, and don't be afraid to talk to him.

Kyle Case:
Don't be afraid to talk to the doctor. Number two is keeping moving. Activities that strengthen your legs and help you balance like Tai Chi or yoga can help you prevent falls. Number three is to check your eyes. Have your vision checked at least once a year, and update your glasses as needed. If you're having a hard time seeing, it makes it very easy to trip over things, to not see the extension cord or that brick or rock that's there, or whatever it happens to be.

Jeff Harding:
You misjudge the step.

Kyle Case:
Misjudge a step, so that's a serious thing. And then other things that you can do, make your home safe. Most falls do happen at home. You want to keep your floors clutter-free. You want to either remove small rugs or make sure that they're taped down or secured in some way. Add grab bars in the bathroom.

Jeff Harding:
Or even down the hallway, if you're going to slip in the hallway.

Kyle Case:
In the hallway or stairways, all those are places where you want to have grab bars, things to hold on to. And then also, make sure that your home has plenty of light because that makes it easier to see. One other thing I wanted to bring up that I think is relevant and important, Dr. Becca Jordre is a physical therapist and she's specifically been studying falls and senior athletes for the past number of years. Just a few months ago, we had a chance to be with her out in New Mexico...

Jeff Harding:
Yep.

Kyle Case:
... at the National Senior Games. And she's, again, been studying this for a while. She's found some really interesting things that I think are worth noting, not the least of which is she says, "Senior athletes demonstrate a considerably lower incidence of falls than their community-dwelling counterparts," which she says supports previous findings that they maintain better overall balance. So senior athletes, generally speaking, maintain better overall balance.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
She says, "Recent investigation into the impact of higher-intensity physical activity supports the premise that exercise can improve higher-level balance abilities and may very well explain the low incidence of falls among senior athletes particularly. She says that it doesn't immune senior athletes from falls.

Jeff Harding:
No, no.

Kyle Case:
False still happen. So she goes on to say that while this population does prove to have superior balance, they can still benefit from regular balance and fall-risk screenings as well as keeping in mind that the impact and cost of one fall could result in loss of participation in the sport that they love. It can also result in hospitalization just like it could for any other group. She says, "In fact, these higher-functioning seniors, meaning the senior athletes, may take higher risks in their day-to-day lives and thus risk falling performing those high-level activities.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
So we still want to be careful even if we're senior athletes.

Jeff Harding:
Sure.

Kyle Case:
But that's pretty big news, Jeff. If you're a senior athlete, your chances of falling are greatly diminished, which makes a lot of sense.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
But it's worth repeating in that context that that might be one more reason to consider signing up for the Huntsman World Senior Games or another senior sporting event.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
Because it does overall strengthen those legs, allow for better balance, and hopefully ideally reduce the risk of fall in your life.

Jeff Harding:
So get off the couch and do it.

Kyle Case:
That's what it's all about, right?

Jeff Harding:
It is.

Kyle Case:
Speaking of senior athletes, Jeff, today, our guest is a longtime senior athlete at the Huntsman World Senior Games. She has competed 13 times at the games. She's a cyclist. She's had a lot of success not only at the games but in other areas of cycling as well. Her name is Donna Ingle. And Donna, we're excited to welcome you to the show today.

Donna Ingle:
Hi. Thank you for welcoming me. I'm glad to be here.

Kyle Case:
So, Donna, you've competed at the Huntsman World Senior Games for 13 years.

Donna Ingle:
Right.

Kyle Case:
That's awesome.

Donna Ingle:
That is. It is. It's been-

Kyle Case:
So tell me... Yeah, go ahead.

Donna Ingle:
No, go ahead. What were you going to ask?

Kyle Case:
Well, I was going to say, tell me a little bit about how you got into cycling in the first place, which led to your participation in the Huntsman World Senior Games?

Donna Ingle:
Well, when I was little, we didn't have a lot of money and my older sister had a bike, so I taught myself how to ride her bicycle. And I had to use it whenever she wasn't on it. And then for my birthday, my dad had a Montgomery Ward- we lived in the country- a big Montgomery Ward's semi-truck came in front of our house, and I had no idea what was going on. And they pulled off a brand new turquoise Montgomery Ward bike.

Jeff Harding:
Oh, I bet that was special. I bet it was.

Donna Ingle:
I cried. Yep, I cried. And from then on, I blamed my cycling on him because I've always loved cycling. And then my husband and I- we've been married 26 years- when we were newlyweds, I had my mother's old bike and he took me to a very steep Red Rock Canyon, kind of like your Snow Canyon in St. George.

Kyle Case:
Now, Red Rock Canyon is in Denver, right?

Donna Ingle:
Yeah. It's actually in Las Vegas.

Kyle Case:
Oh, okay. Okay.

Donna Ingle:
It's a very, very difficult ride, and you can hardly pedal my bike. And he traded me, he let me ride his new Trek, which was awesome. Weeks later he bought me a new bike. And since then, we did centuries and a double century, and just loved riding the bikes. And then a friend suggested the Nevada Senior Games and the Huntsman. And we said, "Well, I'm game. Why not try it?" And we did. We came and we did the Huntsman. And the athletes and the people, the volunteers and the people working, it was just awesome. And we just loved it. So we've been coming back every year. We also participated in the triathlon.

Kyle Case:
That's wonderful. We're so glad that you've had a great experience, that you've enjoyed it, that it's been good enough that you wanted to come back. I want to back up a little bit in your story.

Donna Ingle:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
You talked about getting a bike when you were a young child, as a little girl, and then just kind of carrying that love with you throughout your life, and what will be the rest of your life, I'm certain.

Donna Ingle:
Right.

Kyle Case:
You talked about century rides. For people who are not familiar with that, talk a little bit about what that means and how you prepare for a century ride.

Donna Ingle:
Well, the century ride is a hundred miles. A double century is 200 miles. So we did the Desperado Dual double century in Panguitch, Utah. And we did the St. George. St. George has your century coming up I think the end of October. And I think we're thinking about doing that again.

Jeff Harding:
I think you're right.

Donna Ingle:
Yeah. You have to train, you have to get in shape, and you have to eat. I found that out real quick that if you try to just ride and if you don't stop and eat and drink, you're not going to make it. They're hard but they are a lot of fun.

Kyle Case:
You have to refuel the machine for sure. There's no question about that.

Donna Ingle:
You do, you do. And you have to prepare.

Kyle Case:
I just want to emphasize, you kind of passed over this because of your humble modesty, but you're riding a bike for a hundred miles, 100 miles.

Donna Ingle:
Right.

Jeff Harding:
Or 200.

Donna Ingle:
Yeah, or 200.

Kyle Case:
And in your case, as you did the double century, that's 200 miles. Now, sometimes we throw numbers around and there's no reference point and so it's hard to think about that. But just think about the last time you got into your car and you drove a hundred miles, which we don't do every day.

Jeff Harding:
No, we don't.

Donna Ingle:
No.

Kyle Case:
And think about the distance between a city from where you're at and that city that is a hundred miles away, and then think about not getting in a car but getting on a bicycle and riding that for a hundred miles. That is impressive, Donna. And then when you double that, that makes it even more impressive which is pretty incredible. And I think you hit a very important point there, and that is that you have to prepare for that. And then, during the event itself, you have to take care of fueling your body with energy so you can keep going.

Donna Ingle:
You do, you do. You find out real, real... On the double century, I think we had probably 50 miles left and I was just done. I thought, "I can't do this." Stopped at a rest stop and my husband said, "You have to eat." My stomach is upset, I can't eat. And he says, "Eat something." And I thought, "Well, I'll eat one grape." So I took one grape out of this lady's bowl. I ate the entire bowl of grapes. And then I got on my bike and the last 50 miles just flew.

Kyle Case:
You felt just fine.

Donna Ingle:
Yeah, those grapes energized me and got me going. So I found out then you have to eat even if you don't feel like it.

Jeff Harding:
So how long are you in the saddle for a double century?

Donna Ingle:
We have a lot of saddles in our garage. We could open a shop with our bike saddles. We've tried them all. And you find the one that was the best for you. And that too, you have to spend time on that saddle before you ever get on it and try to go that long on it. You have to get used to it.

Jeff Harding:
How long does it take to do a double century?

Donna Ingle:
We started in the morning and I think we finished about 10:00 at night.

Jeff Harding:
Wow.

Donna Ingle:
It was dark when we finished. We had lights on our bikes. It was a long day.

Kyle Case:
Wow. That's amazing, Donna. To me, that's an incredible feat. And congratulations on that. And I know you've done multiple centuries and that's something that you enjoy doing. To me, that's amazing. For me to think to get on a bike and to ride a hundred miles is certainly beyond what I'm prepared for right now. I just admire that and think that's amazing.

Donna Ingle:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
You're listening to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. And we're talking with Donna Ingle who is a cyclist at the Huntsman World Senior Games. She's not only a cyclist at the games but she's been a competitive cyclist in a variety of different events. And she's also done some century rides. Tell me if this is true, I've found that for the most part, the century rides aren't necessarily competitive in the sense of a race. They're more about personal achievement.

Donna Ingle:
They are.

Kyle Case:
Or is that not true?

Donna Ingle:
No, that is true. That is true. You're doing it to finish it.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Donna Ingle:
You might compete against your old time or you might want to do it a little bit faster, a little bit better than you did before. But it's not like when you're doing the race, like at the Huntsman. When I come to do that, I'm training. I want to do a certain speed. I use a power meter, so I'm going to watch my watts. Like Snow Canyon Hill climb, I know that I want to get that done in a certain amount of time at a certain watt, and that's what I'm training, for now, is to do that. So it is different.

Kyle Case:
A difference between a ride and a race.

Donna Ingle:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
Now I do want to get into your experience at the Huntsman World Senior Games in just a moment.

Donna Ingle:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
But you've also competed in other events.

Donna Ingle:
Right.

Kyle Case:
You mentioned the Nevada Senior Games in particular. Aside from the Nevada Games and the Huntsman World Senior Games, are there other races that you've competed in?

Donna Ingle:
There are. Well, I did the USA Cycling. We've done several of their races. We did Tucson Classic at the beginning of the year. They have Masters Nationals, and I did that. I won the time trial and the road race in that, which is an honor to do. And then at the Huntsman last year, I qualified to go to Masters National Senior Games. And that was in Albuquerque, New Mexico. That was in June of this year. And I got three gold medals and one silver medal but I set some national records in that, which was amazing. And it was fun. You have to qualify, you can't just sign up and go do those races.

Kyle Case:
Right.

Donna Ingle:
So the Huntsman was my qualifying to be able to do that in June.

Kyle Case:
That's amazing. We have a lot of our athletes that come to the Huntsman World Senior Games and use that as a qualifier for the National Senior Games. Of course, we are a member of the National Senior Games Association and that is how and why we get to act as a qualifier. And Donna is just a great example of someone who took advantage of the opportunity to come to the event here in St. George, Utah and then took it onto the qualifying opportunity at the National Senior Games, and then had success there too. Donna, congratulations.

Donna Ingle:
I did, thanks.

Kyle Case:
Three gold medals and a silver and a couple of national records. Tell me what does that feel like? You cross the finish line. You have to know that you've done well. You find out that you just set a national record. Talk about the feelings that you feel at that moment.

Donna Ingle:
Oh, it's exciting. And sometimes I look and I think, "How did I do that?" Because I mean I trained very hard. Every day I'm on my bicycle training. And I run some and I swim some. But I'm constantly training, training, training. But then when it happens, you look back and say, "How did I manage to pull this off?" you know? I did something right. I did something right to be able to do it. It was awesome. It was pretty cool.

Kyle Case:
Well, I'll say you've done something right. That is amazing. Just absolutely incredible.

Donna Ingle:
Yeah. The Huntsman has their records, and the good thing about the Huntsman is that they have the same courses. They have had Snow Canyon Hill climb for, I don't know, 30+ years.

Kyle Case:
Right.

Donna Ingle:
The same course. So I have the women's fastest time of all the women, not just my age group, up Snow Canyon. So that is amazing to me. And then your time trial and your road race too. You have the same courses. And I love that because then I'm competing against records that other people have set.

Kyle Case:
Right.

Donna Ingle:
I want to set new records.

Jeff Harding:
Kyle, remind me not to race Donna up Snow Canyon, okay?

Donna Ingle:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
Unless you're in a car. Maybe in a car. I might do it in a car but she'd probably still beat me.

Donna Ingle:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
I know some of our listeners will not be familiar with the Snow Canyon area. That is the course that we've used for basically since we started doing cycling at the Huntsman World Senior Games.

Donna Ingle:
Right.

Kyle Case:
But I can attest, I live right close to Snow Canyon. We spend a lot of time there driving up and down and enjoying the incredibly beautiful scenery. I have never ridden a bike up Snow Canyon but I have run up Snow Canyon before. And I'm just going to tell you if you're not familiar with the area, it's a pretty demanding hill to climb.

Donna Ingle:
It is. It is, and it's beautiful. It is so gorgeous. I mean I love it. And the sun comes up in the morning when you're waiting to start your race. I just love the area.

Kyle Case:
Something pretty special.

Donna Ingle:
Yep. You're lucky to live there.

Kyle Case:
Now, you mentioned that you've competed at the Huntsman World Senior Games multiple times, 13 times in fact.

Donna Ingle:
Right.

Kyle Case:
I'm wondering if you can think back to that first year, your first year. You've heard about it, you competed at the Nevada Senior Games. You thought, "Hey, I'm going to give this one up in St. George a try." What were some of the experiences or memories that you had about that first time competing at the Huntsman World Senior Games?

Donna Ingle:
Well, I had never raced before so I had a lot to learn. Okay, you do have criterium, and I didn't understand the criterium. So in the criterium, I understood that if they rang the bell, you do a final lap and you go as hard as you can. But they also give out, they call them primes, which is a prize that you can race to win. But I didn't realize that. So I ride my bike past with a group of people, women, and they ring the bell. So it's like, "Okay, go as hard as you can because this is the last lap, you're going to win this race." I went hard as I could. And when I passed the announcer's stand, he says, "We have Donna Ingle and she just won her packet of energy gel." And my husband's down here on the sideline and he yells, "Donna, you don't even like an energy gel." I used every bit of my energy...

Kyle Case:
To win the energy gel, but unfortunately not the race.

Donna Ingle:
... win some... Yeah, yeah. Yeah, and then all the other women, of course, caught back up to me, and then we finished the race. He then rang the bell again and I listened to where he said the last lap. I said, "Okay, this is it." I did that. And then on the time trial you had, it was a different course. We had a U-turn and I came into that corner and I was going 20+ miles an hour, fast as I could.

Jeff Harding:
Oh boy. Oh no.

Donna Ingle:
Yep. Locked up my back brake, slid, the tire went out. I landed between the cones. And of course, all the people and volunteers and the officials down there come running to help me. I'm like, "No, no, no, I'm fine." My knee's bloody. I put the chain back on my bike, jumped on my bike, and took off as fast as I could. And I still managed to win the time trial.

Jeff Harding:
Wow.

Donna Ingle:
But yeah, I learned a lot, that's for sure. And yeah, you learn that people are great. I mean the other racers are there to help you. They help each other. We're competitive but we love each other and we're there. We always got each other's back for everything.

Kyle Case:
That's one of the consistent themes that we hear over and over at the games. People come for the competition, and the competition is certainly there. They enjoy that aspect of it. But there's also such a feeling of comradery and friendship and support.

Donna Ingle:
There is.

Kyle Case:
We just, we just hear that over and over. And I'm glad that you've been able to experience that. Donna, we've only got about one minute left to visit with you. I'm wondering if you set any goals for yourself for this upcoming event that's just a few weeks away.

Donna Ingle:
Well, my goal is to do my very best. I've got certain wattage that I want to do going up to Snow Canyon. I've been working on it. I hold the record for the hill climb for the 60 to 64 and then 65 to 69-year-old women. So I would love to break my old records. But sometimes it's not just my training. Sometimes you have to have... Like if it's got a strong headwind going down that canyon...

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Donna Ingle:
... it's not going to happen. So that's my goal is I'd like to break the records that I hold and do better yet.

Kyle Case:
Wow, impressive. That's an impressive goal.

Donna Ingle:
Yeah. Looking forward to seeing all my friends thought too.

Kyle Case:
That sounds fantastic. And we wish you nothing but the very best of luck as you strive for that goal, breaking your record. But we wish you the best.

Donna Ingle:
Okay, thank you.

Kyle Case:
Can't wait to see you in October.

Donna Ingle:
Me neither. I can't wait to come.

Kyle Case:
Wonderful. Well, we'll look for you. We'll look for you then out on the cycling courses.

Donna Ingle:
All right. Thank you.

Kyle Case:
So Jeff,...

Donna Ingle:
Yes, Kyle.

Kyle Case:
... as you know, and as we know, we've been talking about for the past couple of weeks, registration is closed.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, it is.

Kyle Case:
But it's worth noting that it's not too late to be a part of the Huntsman World Senior Games.

Jeff Harding:
Not.

Kyle Case:
You can sign up to be one of the more than 3,000 volunteers who help us pull off the games, really the all-stars of the games.

Jeff Harding:
They are, they are.

Kyle Case:
It's very easy to register as a volunteer. All you got to do is visit seniorgames.net and click on the volunteer tab. There's a ton of volunteer opportunities that include both helping with the sports as well as helping in non-sport areas. There are tons of health benefits to volunteering as we've talked about on the show before.

Jeff Harding:
There are.

Kyle Case:
And we could use your help. So hit up seniorgames.net and register to volunteer today. I don't think you'll regret it.

Jeff Harding:
Oh, no.

Kyle Case:
I think people will enjoy it.

Jeff Harding:
Most people are very happy they've done it.

Kyle Case:
Also, I'm going to put it in a quick plug for our opening ceremonies. It takes place at Trailblazer Stadium at Dixie State University. It's on Tuesday, October 8th. The gates open at 6:00 PM and the show starts at 7:00. And Jeff, what a great show.

Jeff Harding:
You will be entertained.

Kyle Case:
We have singing, we have dancing, we've got a motivational speech that will be delivered by three-time Olympic gold medalists, Leah Amico. Don't forget the fireworks at the end. It's just an amazing show. Bring your friends, bring your family. You can get more information at seniorgames.net. But again, it takes place on Tuesday night at 7:00 at Trailblazer Stadium. Remember to tune in live next to and every Thursday at 5:30 PM Mountain Time on AM 1450 or FM 93.1 for the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. And of course, you can subscribe to our podcast pretty much anywhere that podcasts are found. Jeff, our inspirational thought for the day, you ready?

Jeff Harding:
I'm ready.

Kyle Case:
Don't limit your challenges, challenge your limits.

Jeff Harding:
There you go.

Kyle Case:
Until next Thursday, stay active.

Jeff Harding:
Bye, everyone.