Today Kyle and Jeff talk about a handful of solid, science-based ideas on how to drop some pounds and keep them off. We also visit with Sue Hoskins, the women’s basketball director for the Huntsman World Senior Games. Check it out at Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life podcast!

 

Kyle Case:
Hello and welcome to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. My name is Kyle Case, and I'll be your host on this amazing journey as we attempt to help you get the most out of your life. Joining me in the studio today is my copilot, Jeff Harding. Jeff, how are you doing today?

Jeff Harding:
I'm feeling tip-top, Kyle.

Kyle Case:
Tiptop.

Jeff Harding:
That's right. Tip. Top.

Kyle Case:
I like that. I like that. It's crisp. There's a sharp-

Jeff Harding:
How are you doing?

Kyle Case:
I'm doing good. I'm doing good. I'm getting ready for the Huntsman World Senior Games.

Jeff Harding:
You know what? So am I. That's amazing.

Kyle Case:
You're feeling the same way, aren't you?

Jeff Harding:
Yes. Yes.

Kyle Case:
Yes. It's on its way and we're excited about it.

Jeff Harding:
Just around that corner.

Kyle Case:
Looking forward to about 11,000 athletes coming to compete. More than 11,000. I think we're going to...potentially we're on target to break a record this year.

Jeff Harding:
We are if everybody gets on the stick and gets here.

Kyle Case:
Yes, so hopefully that'll happen for us.

Jeff Harding:
You bet.

Kyle Case:
Today, Jeff-

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
...I have, I think, an interesting topic to start us off with.

Jeff Harding:
Okay, great. It's not going to be... Nevermind. I won't go into this. I won't even broach that subject.

Kyle Case:
All of your standard things, it's not going to be right. It's probably one of your standard things.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
I think it's fair to say that people, the world over struggling with weight.

Jeff Harding:
Okay. Yes.

Kyle Case:
Right?

Jeff Harding:
Yes. Okay. [crosstalk 00:01:20]

Kyle Case:
We all have a little bit of- [crosstalk 00:01:22]

Jeff Harding:
...as I try to hide behind the counter a little bit more.

Kyle Case:
It's not easy to lose weight, and maybe the only thing that's harder than losing weight is losing the weight and then keeping it off.

Jeff Harding:
That's true.

Kyle Case:
Right?

Jeff Harding:
Why's it so easy to put on, and so hard to get off?

Kyle Case:
I don't know.

Jeff Harding:
That doesn't make sense.

Kyle Case:
I don't know.

Jeff Harding:
It's not fair.

Kyle Case:
It feels like maybe the cards are just kind of stacked against us. There's a lot of sugar, added sugar in our diets that sometimes we're not aware of. Often we are aware of it and don't care that much.

Jeff Harding:
But we enjoy it.

Kyle Case:
But we enjoy it. Right? Today I found an article written by Christine Mathis on health.com, listen to this title.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
That'll get to you. 57 ways to lose weight according to science.

Jeff Harding:
We better get going-

Kyle Case:
According to science. Now, I'm not going to go through 57.

Jeff Harding:
Oh good, because I was a little worried.

Kyle Case:
I'm just going to focus on just a few of them. The subtitle though listens to the subtitle of the article.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
The best weight loss, excuse me, the best weight loss tips of all time.

Jeff Harding:
You're all choked up over it aren't you Kyle?

Kyle Case:
I'm a little emotional about this, I feel passionate about it. Anyway, let's dive into it. Are you ready?

Jeff Harding:
Alrighty.

Kyle Case:
So as you're probably aware, more than two-thirds of adults in the United States are either overweight or obese. We talked about that before. Weight loss is a $20 billion industry, but if you're trying to slim down, there's no reason to lose hope. There's plenty of studies that show that lasting weight loss is possible, that it's not just a made-up story or a myth. It can be done.

Jeff Harding:
I was beginning to think it was a fairy tale.

Kyle Case:
It's not a fairy tale. It can be done. It's just difficult. So I'm going to share some of the things that science says will help us lose weight and keep it off-

Jeff Harding:
They're probably pretty into-

Kyle Case:
Science.

Jeff Harding:
...it's probably intuitive too.

Kyle Case:
This is according to science.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
Some of it's intuitive, a lot of it might be intuitive, but I'm going to share with you the scientific studies.

Jeff Harding:
All right. Lay it on me.

Kyle Case:
Are you ready?

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Number one, I think you're going to like this one. Number one, eat a big breakfast.

Jeff Harding:
I can do that.

Kyle Case:
Now, when you think about losing weight and you think about eating a big breakfast, they don't always correlate.

Jeff Harding:
But in some ways, it does because-

Kyle Case:
In some ways it does.

Jeff Harding:
...You have more time to burn that energy off and you need somebody to get you going in the morning so it makes sense.

Kyle Case:
If you follow that line of logic, I think it makes sense, but we've all heard a million times, "Start your day with a balanced breakfast." I think that's common sense.

Jeff Harding:
Uh-huh (affirmative). Especially cereal makers. They promote that to [crosstalk 00:03:27], right?

Kyle Case:
Right. Here's the science part though. This is the important part. At Imperial College London, they did a study that found that when people skipped breakfast, the reward centers in their brains lit up when they were shown pictures of high-calorie foods. So that means that if you skip breakfast, you're more tempted by bad for you snacks later on in the day.

Jeff Harding:
That makes sense.

Kyle Case:
On top of that, a 2013 study found that women who enjoyed a large morning meal had a larger drop in Ghrelin, which is the hunger hormone than those who ate a small breakfast. So-

Jeff Harding:
Eat a big breakfast.

Kyle Case:
...eat a big breakfast in the morning.

Jeff Harding:
I can do that.

Kyle Case:
Now that we've just talked about breakfast. I think you're going to like the second one-

Jeff Harding:
Is it a big lunch?

Kyle Case:
Well, come on. I can't just keep saying eat big meals-

Jeff Harding:
A guy can hope.

Kyle Case:
...and you're going to lose weight.

Jeff Harding:
Okay, lay it on me.

Kyle Case:
It's not eating a big lunch, although, your face did light up with hope.

Jeff Harding:
It did, it did.

Kyle Case:
No, you can't eat a big lunch. However, you should finish your breakfast with something sweet.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
You like that, right?

Jeff Harding:
I do.

Kyle Case:
That feels good, right? Studies have found that the benefit of wrapping up your morning meal with dessert really with a dessert, is beneficial. This was a Tel Aviv University medical center study. They gave one group of people a 304 calorie breakfast that had 10 grams of carbs while the other group ate a 600 calorie breakfast with 60 grams of carbs, and that included a small sweet such as a chocolate, a donut, a cookie or cake, and then halfway through the eight months study, both groups had lost an average of 33 pounds per person-

Jeff Harding:
Really?

Kyle Case:
...which is pretty good.

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Thirty-three pounds in eight months, that's not bad. In the end, however, the low carb group regained 22 pounds.

Jeff Harding:
Wow.

Kyle Case:
While the dessert group dropped an additional 15 pounds.

Jeff Harding:
You know it's ironic is the other day my grandson was asking my wife what they were going to have for dessert-

Kyle Case:
For dessert for breakfast?

Jeff Harding:
...for breakfast. Yes, she was.

Kyle Case:
Well, he's onto something.

Jeff Harding:
He was on this very serious too.

Kyle Case:
He's onto something. So a researcher says that desert eaters reported dealing with fewer cravings, which is similar to what we just talked about and a better chance of sticking to their calorie requirements for the rest of the day. So consider adding a little bit of dessert at the end of your breakfast.

Jeff Harding:
Not a hard to [crosstalk 00:05:43] consideration. It's done.

Kyle Case:
You could do that, right?

Jeff Harding:
Done.

Kyle Case:
Here's the next one. Eat 30 grams of fiber a day.

Jeff Harding:
And what does that look like?

Kyle Case:
Your face didn't light up for that one for some reason.

Jeff Harding:
Well, it's because I don't know what 30 grams look like.

Kyle Case:
You've got to get out to your little food scale-

Jeff Harding:
I mean I like fiber so it's not a problem man.

Kyle Case:
...it will tell you what 30 grams is.

Jeff Harding:
I like fibrous foods.

Kyle Case:
Let me tell you the science for this one. Some scientific research shows that upping your fiber intake may work just as well as following a strict diet. That's the science part. In an American Heart Association study, one group was instructed to follow a diet with strict nutrient goals and limits on their calories, their sugar, their saturated fat, while the other group was given one goal and one goal only. That was to consume 30 grams of fiber a day, and at the end of three months, both groups had lost roughly the same amount of weight and improve their heart health, which shows that losing weight may be just as easy as filling up on a little bit more fiber.

Jeff Harding:
There you go.

Kyle Case:
That's a good thing, right?

Jeff Harding:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
I'm going to keep going. Stock your freezer with vegetables. This is one-

Jeff Harding:
Oh yeah.

Kyle Case:
...I know that you like.

Jeff Harding:
I do.

Kyle Case:
You like fruits and vegetables.

Jeff Harding:
I'm a veggie guy, yes.

Kyle Case:
Fresh, in-season produce, gives you the biggest nutritional boost. That's important to know.

Jeff Harding:
Of course.

Kyle Case:
But frozen vegetables come in a very close second and very shortly after they're being picked, if you put those ripe vegetables in the freezer and they're frozen, it allows them to lock in many of their nutrients. So having a stash of vegetables in your freezer makes eating on the fly much easier because it's accessible and it's easy, and it reduces the chance that you might order a pizza instead.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
Okay. This one is another one that I think you're going to like.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
All these are good ones for you Jeff.

Jeff Harding:
They are.

Kyle Case:
This one you'll like, make dairy part of your diet. A dairy-rich diet loads you up with calcium and vitamin D and nutrients that help build muscle and boost your metabolism as well. Plus the hormone Calcitriol helps conserve calcium for stronger bones while instructing your fat cells to convert less sugar to fat and burn more body fat. Now I know-

Jeff Harding:
There you go.

Kyle Case:
...you like cheese-

Jeff Harding:
I do.

Kyle Case:
...and cheese is a dairy product.

Jeff Harding:
I knew that.

Kyle Case:
How am I doing with you?

Jeff Harding:
You're my friend today, Kyle.

Kyle Case:
Am I doing okay? Am I doing okay?

Jeff Harding:
Don't mess up. Don't mess up Kyle.

Kyle Case:
All right. Here's my last one.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
Then we going to get into some other important things that we want to talk about today. The last one on my list. Snack on pistachios.

Jeff Harding:
I like pistachios.

Kyle Case:
Yes, and I think we've talked before about the health benefits of pistachios. I like pistachios as well. Foods that require peeling, shelling or individual unwrapping like-

Jeff Harding:
Like candy bars. [crosstalk 00:08:15]

Kyle Case:
How did I know you are going to go there? How did I know-

Jeff Harding:
You set me up.

Kyle Case:
...you were going to go there?

Jeff Harding:
Individual unwrapping, what else has it but candy bars.

Kyle Case:
No, Jeff. The answer is, like pistachios-

Jeff Harding:
Or corn on the cob. Ears of corn.

Kyle Case:
You do have to unwrap corn on as well, which we found out a few weeks ago was good for you as well.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, that's true.

Kyle Case:
But no, I'm talking about pistachios.

Jeff Harding:
You have to crack them, yes.

Kyle Case:
So pistachios, Jeff.

Jeff Harding:
Uh-huh (affirmative)

Kyle Case:
Get pistachios in your mind.

Jeff Harding:
Okay. [crosstalk 00:08:40].

Kyle Case:
You're envisioning that.

Jeff Harding:
Okay, I can see [inaudible 00:08:41].

Kyle Case:
Okay, pistachios.

Jeff Harding:
But, I've got the pre-shelled ones. Is that okay?

Kyle Case:
Well, it's okay. It's not as good though, but it's okay. Pistachios are good for you, whether they're pre-shelled or not. Regardless, let me finish me...Let me finish my thought here.

Jeff Harding:
Go ahead.

Kyle Case:
Food that requires peeling, shelling or individual unwrapping like pistachios force you to slow down your eating.

Jeff Harding:
Or coconuts.

Kyle Case:
Or coconuts. Slowing down your eating may help you consume less overall.

Jeff Harding:
That's true.

Kyle Case:
That's the point I'm trying to get to.

Jeff Harding:
That is true because with you...I mean even if you have one of those nut trays around Christmas time where you have to crack them.

Kyle Case:
Yes, it slows you down.

Jeff Harding:
It does.

Kyle Case:
Yes, anything that you have to open or that comes prepackaged does potentially slow you down. Here's, here's some other benefits. A one-ounce serving of pistachios provides 6 grams of protein and 3 grams of fiber and it only has 159 calories and the fat that's found in pistachios is good for your heart. If you're looking to drop a few pounds, pistachios are a good way to go.

Jeff Harding:
There was some onomatopoeia there.

Kyle Case:
Yes, there was. That's just a hint at some of the 57 ways to lose weight according to science and we'll share the link on our website so you can run through the rest of them when you have some time.

Kyle Case:
Today's guest, Jeff is Sue Hoskins. Sue is an alumnus of Dixie State University where she played both basketball and volleyball as a student-athlete. Her connection to sports certainly did not end there. She's currently a college and high school volleyball official. She is also the volleyball director of the Larry H. Miller volleyball event at the Larry H. Miller Utah Summer Games. Then is also the basketball director for the Huntsman World Senior Games. She is all about sports, particularly basketball and volleyball and Sue, we're glad that you could join us today.

Sue Hoskins:
Thank you, happy to be here.

Kyle Case:
So what do you think about pistachios?

Sue Hoskins:
I love pistachios.

Jeff Harding:
My kind of woman.

Sue Hoskins:
My husband would eat pistachios for every meal-

Kyle Case:
All-day, every day.

Sue Hoskins:
...if it was allowed.

Kyle Case:
There you go, there are good for you. It's a good dietary choice.

Jeff Harding:
Especially the ones with the shells still on so he has to work harder to- [crosstalk 00:10:44]

Kyle Case:
You have to slow down when you eat.

Kyle Case:
So let's talk a little bit about sports. Sue, you've been involved in sports your whole life.

Sue Hoskins:
My whole life.

Kyle Case:
Did you play basketball as a young woman?

Sue Hoskins:
I played with whatever sport was thrown in front of me as a kid. I tried to get involved with the boy's teams because they were a lot more challenging and whatever sport it was, I was there.

Jeff Harding:
Were they welcoming?

Kyle Case:
Baseball, soccer-

Sue Hoskins:
Baseball, softball-

Kyle Case:
Softball.

Sue Hoskins:
Basketball-

Kyle Case:
Basketball.

Sue Hoskins:
Volleyball-

Kyle Case:
Volleyball.

Sue Hoskins:
Soc-Yes

Jeff Harding:
Were the boy's teams welcoming?

Sue Hoskins:
Absolutely.

Jeff Harding:
Great.

Kyle Case:
They wanted a good athlete.

Jeff Harding:
I'd say she's probably a great athlete.

Kyle Case:
They wanted a good athlete. Of the sports that you played, that you started with as a young woman and as a girl and growing up, which one's your favorite one? Which one stands out as like, this is my sport?

Sue Hoskins:
Everyone always asks me that question. Especially as an official that I get asked that a lot. I would have to say that I very much still enjoy basketball.

Kyle Case:
Basketball?

Sue Hoskins:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kyle Case:
Like to play it, like to officiate it.

Sue Hoskins:
Like to watch it.

Kyle Case:
Awesome.

Sue Hoskins:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
Who's your favorite NBA team? Put you on the spot.

Sue Hoskins:
I don't like the NBA at all.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Jeff Harding:
How about the WNBA team?

Sue Hoskins:
Huh?

Jeff Harding:
How about the WNBA team?

Sue Hoskins:
WNBA? These Las Vegas Aces that are doing so-

Jeff Harding:
They're doing pretty good.

Sue Hoskins:
...well this season-

Kyle Case:
Entertaining.

Sue Hoskins:
...they're fun to watch.

Kyle Case:
They've got a great a team. And they're winning some games.

Sue Hoskins:
Yes, but I love college basketball. March Madness is Christmas in March for me. I love March Madness.

Kyle Case:
Awesome. It's great that we have access and there are so many good fans out there and great reasons to watch and to be inspired at the hard work and the dedication of athletes.

Kyle Case:
Speaking of which you're involved in a couple of pretty great sporting events on an intimate level, you help run the Utah Summer Games volleyball event and of course, you've been involved with the basketball, women's basketball event here at the Huntsman World Senior Games for years.

Kyle Case:
How did you transition, or how was the transition for you from a player to an event organizer? You also are the arbiter, you help put together the officials for many events around our area and in other areas as well. Let me ask you this, do you still play sports or have you mostly transitioned to the organization, the organizing aspect of it?

Sue Hoskins:
If I didn't have five kids, I would probably still be playing-

Kyle Case:
5 kids make a difference.

Sue Hoskins:
My spare time is usually spent watching them at their sporting events. People have asked me to play, but age does set in at some point. Even though your mind tells you that you're still a good athlete, your body sometimes doesn't keep up.

Kyle Case:
I'm going to provide you with a little bit of hope because I know that you love to play sports and I know that, just like what you said, sometimes family makes it challenging and schedules and work and so many things. I'm just going to say and you know this, because you've seen it every year, but so, so many of our athletes at the Huntsman World Senior Games have gone through the period of life that you are right smack in the middle of right now.

Kyle Case:
For any number of good reasons, you have to set aside that love and that passion for playing sports. But as you've seen again, year after year at the Huntsman World Senior Games, so many people, women, and men are able, once they get through this time in their life, to pick back up where they left off. It just becomes just this joy once again. So don't give up on it. There's still time for you in the future.

Sue Hoskins:
I haven't given up.

Kyle Case:
Yes, absolutely.

Sue Hoskins:
I talked to a girlfriend that I played with at Dixie State and I said, "We're beating on the door, a couple of years from now, you better be ready to come down and play again."

Kyle Case:
That is awesome. I love it when people are looking forward to it. You're listening to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life and we're talking with Sue Hoskins. She is the director of women's basketball at the Huntsman World Senior Games.

Kyle Case:
In addition to being the director of women's basketball, she also helps pull together all the officials for all of our basketball events, the men's and the women's, which has got to be a big job. How do you stay connected so that you can pull these officials in? Because officiating is such an important part of a successful event.

Sue Hoskins:
I've been an official myself for several years, so I do have a lot of contacts-

Kyle Case:
A lot of connections.

Sue Hoskins:
...and we do have a lot of local officials that want to come and work at the senior games year after year after year. They enjoy it. We have some out of state officials that enjoy this experience as well, and they request to come back and officiate.

Kyle Case:
As long as they're good, we want them back.

Sue Hoskins:
Right. Exactly.

Kyle Case:
We want them.

Sue Hoskins:
Absolutely.

Kyle Case:
Excellent. Well, that's great. Again, the officiating aspect of any organized tournament is so important. Sue does a phenomenal job of bringing in good people and helping manage and making sure, not only that they're good people and qualified to officiate, but also that they're at the right place at the right time, which is part of the challenge. Add to that the fact that you're also coordinating the women's basketball tournament and it becomes a very busy two weeks for you.

Sue Hoskins:
Yes, it does. Not only the two weeks that it's going on but several weeks in preparation-

Kyle Case:
Leading up to it.

Sue Hoskins:
...for it, especially with the assigning of the officials. That's a pretty-

Kyle Case:
Big job.

Sue Hoskins:
...pretty heavy task.

Kyle Case:
Now you've been involved with the women's basketball for quite a while at the Huntsman World Senior Games. Are there any memories of teams or players or events that just stand out to you over those years that you've been involved?

Sue Hoskins:
We have had the teams from Michigan come every year that I have been involved and they bring at least three teams.

Kyle Case:
Michigan Spirit-

Sue Hoskins:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kyle Case:
...is what you're talking about.

Sue Hoskins:
Yes, there are some well-known characters on those teams- [crosstalk 00:17:00].

Kyle Case:
I think that's a fair way to put it, right?

Jeff Harding:
Within the Huntsman World Senior Games circles around the world? Are they well known within the-

Sue Hoskins:
In the Huntsman Games circle, yes. The other teams know that when they come to play that those Michigan Spirit teams are going to be here.

Kyle Case:
They play with gusto. They play with-

Sue Hoskins:
Yes, they do.

Kyle Case:
...spirit.

Sue Hoskins:
With passion and everybody knows them. They're just a very fun part of the women's basketball as well as some other staples teams that we have, teams from Canada team from Virginia. We can always count on them being at the Senior Games.

Kyle Case:
I think that's worth noting and remembering and even celebrating that athletes at the Huntsman World Senior Games do come from all around the world and basketball is no exception. We've had teams from Lithuania, women's basketball teams from Lithuania that have been here. You mentioned Canada and then of course from all around the various states in the United States.

Kyle Case:
I'm curious as you're involved with this sport and as you're watching it happen and watching it unfold and you've got these teams that are traditional that kind of come every year. Are there geographic areas where you find basketball is stronger than in some areas or does that not really play into it? Have you noticed that as a trend?

Sue Hoskins:
I think that from what I've observed in the way that they talk, I think Southern California seems to be a hot spot for-

Kyle Case:
A lot of players there.

Sue Hoskins:
...for the leagues and a lot of players and it would be good to get a few more teams from there, but we do have some very consistent teams that come up-

Kyle Case:
From there.

Sue Hoskins:
...from San Diego to play, yes.

Kyle Case:
I know that especially in Southern California, but as in California as a whole, the state as a whole, there is a very developed league program for women's basketball, senior women's basketball and man, there are some great teams that play in that area that call that area home.

Kyle Case:
We had an opportunity several months ago to go to the National Senior Games in Albuquerque and we watched some of the women's basketball games and great play, great play, and we watched one of the gold medal matches. Unfortunately, I can't remember what age group it was, but probably the 55s, I'm guessing. One of the teams was from Southern California. Just a very developed system that they have there.

Kyle Case:
If anyone's listening, we'd love to have, like Sue said, a few more teams from that area come on up to St. George and compete in the Huntsman World Senior Games.

Kyle Case:
Any players that have stood out over the years that you've worked with? Either as star players or just great sports or you've had a chance to meet a lot of people. Anything that stands out?

Sue Hoskins:
You know, when we have that team from Latvia come and participate with us, they have some characters on their team. They sort of have maybe a different style of playing basketball and they seem to be very physical. I think some of our United States teams aren't used to that type of play. They do know that when they go up against some of those players from Latvia that they're going to get pushed and shoved-

Kyle Case:
Get ready.

Sue Hoskins:
...a little bit more. It's interesting because they don't speak English, but they do understand some basketball phrases, that makes it good for them to come and play. They're great players, very good players.

Kyle Case:
Again, one of the great aspects I believe of the Huntsman World Senior Games is that opportunity, not only to play with great players but to interact with people from other parts of the world, from all around the world.

Kyle Case:
In so many cases you wouldn't have that opportunity if it weren't for the Huntsman World Senior Games and the chance to just bring teams from all around the planet to come together and celebrate active aging and sport as a whole and that's awesome. I've known that the Latvian team is here. I've said hello to them, but I've never really had a chance to watch them play. So next time they're here, I want to make sure that I get over to a game. It sounds like it'd be a fun one.

Sue Hoskins:
Yes, all those women are just, they're coming to compete, but for them, it's that they're staying active, that they love basketball and that competition, winning that gold is not the most important thing for them. It's coming and participating, seeing old friends running into people year after year and just having three good days of good basketball.

Kyle Case:
Yes. We say that all the time because we hear it from our athletes. Oftentimes the decision, the first decision to come is because they've heard about the competition and they hear that it's a great tournament, which it is, but he reason they come back is what you've described. They come back for that friendship, for that comradery, for the opportunity to hang out with a bunch of people who feel just like you do about a sport that you're passionate about. That's one of the things that we provide, that we're proud to provide to our athletes, but also one of the things that make the Games special.

Kyle Case:
You've been involved with the sports, as we said, you're always hanging out and helping with the officials. The Games offers a lot of things outside of sports, from sports socials to opening ceremonies. Is there anything outside of the typical sporting venue that stands out to you that maybe you have a memory about?

Sue Hoskins:
I think the ladies look forward to going and participating in the opening ceremonies. They like to march, but the thing I think they mention the most is that they love to come to St. George because of the scenery and the sites that we have around us. I often hear them talking about what they're going to do in their free time and they always comment about, "We love-

Kyle Case:
Going on a hike or-

Sue Hoskins:
...the beautiful scenery." The red rocks are just so amazing here. I think that they like to take in the sites and the area in which we live when they come here as well.

Kyle Case:
Awesome. We do hear that from a lot of our athletes and frankly, we get to live in a beautiful, beautiful place. So many people get to come during the Huntsman World Senior Games and celebrate and enjoy and just get outside and appreciate it.

Kyle Case:
Sue, thank you. Thanks for joining us today. Thanks for all that you do to help make the game successful. We're looking forward to a great event this year. We've got just a few weeks to go. I know you're at crunch time just like we are, but best of luck in your preparations. Again, thank you for all that you do.

Sue Hoskins:
Thank you. I'm looking forward to basketball.

Kyle Case:
Awesome. Jeff?

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Registration.

Jeff Harding:
It's closed.

Kyle Case:
It's closed.

Jeff Harding:
Slammed shut.

Kyle Case:
Officially closed, but don't worry, you could still be involved in the Huntsman World Senior Games if you register as a volunteer.

Jeff Harding:
That's right.

Kyle Case:
It takes about 3000 volunteers to pull off the Huntsman World Senior Games. Just today we sorted out 3000 T-shirts for our volunteer army.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, we did.

Kyle Case:
We're looking forward to a great group. If you are interested in registering as a volunteer and being a part of volunteering for the Games, visit senior games.net and click on the volunteer tab. There's a ton of volunteer opportunities that include both helping with the sports, as well as helping in the non-sports areas. There are tons of health benefits to volunteering as we've talked about on the show and we could use your help. So hit senior games.net and register to volunteer today.

Kyle Case:
Also, I want to put it into another quick plug for our opening ceremonies. It takes place at Trailblazer Stadium at Dixie State University. It's on Tuesday, October 8th. The Gates open at 6:00 PM and the show starts at seven and it is an amazing show. We'll have singing, dancing, motivational speech by three-time Olympic gold medalist, Lia Amoco, and don't forget the fireworks at the end. It's incredible.

Kyle Case:
You can get more information as senior games.net you don't want to miss it. Remember to tune in live next to and every Thursday at 5:30 PM mountain time on AM1450 or FM93.1 for the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. You can also subscribe to our podcast anywhere that podcasts are found. Once you've subscribed, give us a rating and write a quick review. You can also find this and previous shows, right on our website. Again, senior games.net so check that out.

Kyle Case:
Jeff, our inspirational thought for the day.

Jeff Harding:
I'm ready.

Kyle Case:
If you're searching for that one person that will change your life. Take a look in the mirror.

Jeff Harding:
[crosstalk 00:25:35] Yes.

Kyle Case:
Until next Thursday. Stay active. Bye, everyone.