It turns out that osteoporosis is not just for the women to worry about. Studies show that older men are also at great risk for bone loss and all the problems associated. In today’s episode, Kyle and Jeff talk about what you can do, both men and women, to mitigate or even eliminate the risk of osteoporosis. We also visit with Huntsman World Senior Games athlete Dennis Awsumb about sports, life, and horseshoes. Check it out Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life podcast.

 

Kyle Case:
(singing)

Kyle Case:
Hello and welcome to The Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. My name is Kyle Case and I'll be your host on this amazing journey as we attempt to help you get the most out of your life. Joining me in the studio today is my co-pilot, Jeff Harding. Jeff, how you doing today?

Jeff Harding:
I am doing well, Kyle. I'm doing well.

Kyle Case:
Good.

Jeff Harding:
How are you?

Kyle Case:
You know, I'm doing good. I'm fighting off a little bit of a cold. Maybe you can hear the scratchiness in my voice.

Jeff Harding:
I can hear a little extra nasal, yeah.

Kyle Case:
But I'm doing good. I'm going to go with that.

Jeff Harding:
Well, Kyle, you look good.

Kyle Case:
Thank you. Thank you. If you look good, you better feel good.

Jeff Harding:
Kyle, you're probably told this a few times but you have a great face for radio.

Kyle Case:
Thank you.

Jeff Harding:
No problem.

Kyle Case:
I appreciate that.

Jeff Harding:
I've been told that by a lot so ...

Kyle Case:
And perhaps resemble that as well.

Jeff Harding:
I've been told that my entire life, so yeah.

Kyle Case:
So Jeff, let's jump into our intro.

Jeff Harding:
Okay, let's do it.

Kyle Case:
Are you familiar with the bone degenerating disease known as Osteoporosis?

Jeff Harding:
I've heard about it, yes I have.

Kyle Case:
I know you have. We've actually talked about it on the show before.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, we have.

Kyle Case:
When we talk about Osteoporosis, generally speaking, are we talking to men or women?

Jeff Harding:
Well usually it's women but it does affect both.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, so, for the most part, I think that we recognize that it's a big problem for women as they age. There are some hormones that play there and it tends to be a real challenge. But they're finding, Jeff, that it's become more and more a problem for men as they age as well. For the past several decades, as I said, doctors have really stressed the importance of bone health to women and Osteoporosis hasn't really been regarded as a major problem for men but the International Osteoporosis Foundation has found that one in five men over the age of 50 will suffer a fracture due to this bone deteriorating condition. This is a little bit worth noting. They found that men are 27% more likely to break a bone because of Osteoporosis than they are to get prostate cancer.

Jeff Harding:
That's pretty impressive.

Kyle Case:
And according to the report, men are also twice as likely as women to die following one of those fractures. So it's something that we need to be aware of certainly for both men and women. This is kind of new information for the men side though. We've been familiar with the women's side of it for a while. Here's the thing, Jeff. The problems that come with Osteoporosis really are largely preventable if we can take specific steps earlier on in our 20s, 30s, and 40s. We can preserve the bone mass that we do have and your skeleton should be in much better shape once you reach retirement age. They find that bodies build up bone mass in the late teens and 20s and then the process tends to plateau, levels off a little bit.

Jeff Harding:
Well, especially those teenagers. They get bone heads and it's just ...

Kyle Case:
There are some boneheaded people out there, right Jeff?

Jeff Harding:
Yes. Especially the teens. Yes.

Kyle Case:
Anyway, they do find that in your 50s your bone density declines. This deterioration accelerates more and more after your 50s, giving older men a much higher risk of Osteoporosis and of course those fractures that could potentially come with it. Here's the solution. Experts suggest avoiding a couple of things. Don't smoke.

Jeff Harding:
Okay, check.

Kyle Case:
And they found that drinking more than two alcoholic drinks a day leads to the problem. So if you avoid drinking more than two drinks a day then you're going to avoid some of those significant problems.

Jeff Harding:
And we should probably point out that size does matter. Two drinks if they're full glasses, it's not the same as just the two [crosstalk 00:03:42] alcohol.

Kyle Case:
Two servings. Two alcoholic servings are what they're talking about because for some reason-

Jeff Harding:
Because I know that people try to circumvent that rule.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Just make a bigger glass, right? For some reason, they're finding that modest drinking doesn't seem to be a problem when it comes to Osteoporosis. They don't know exactly why having more than two drinks a day affects the bone mass but for whatever reason, observational studies show that it does. So avoiding those two things are potential risk avoidance strategies I guess. The next step that they say is to make sure that you get enough calcium. We know that calcium is very important when it comes to having strong bones. We are all constantly losing calcium through sweat and urine, so we need to replace that mineral on a daily basis. The recommended amount is 1250 milligrams a day. And I think most of us know dairy is rich in calcium. They say that an eight-ounce glass of skim milk has 300 milligrams of calcium. And they say that the rest of your diet should be able to supply what you need from a calcium standpoint. So make sure that you're checking into that. I know that leafy greens have calcium. Of course cheese, yogurt, all the dairies ... that has calcium as well.

Jeff Harding:
And a good supplement doesn't hurt.

Kyle Case:
If you can't have dairy, they recommend that you get a good calcium supplement. Vitamin D is also important in our bone health because it helps the body absorb the calcium that we're getting from our food. They do say that sometimes getting enough vitamin D can be a little bit tricky. We don't normally get adequate vitamin D through our diet. And if you live in the northern part of the country in the United States of America, from the beginning of October through the end of March, you don't get very much from the sun. So they say that there is some vitamin D in fortified eggs, milk, and fruit juices. But they suggest taking a supplement to ensure that you're stocked up on vitamin D. They recommend that you need to get 25-100 micrograms of vitamin D a day. And then the last thing that they recommend and this is one that we talk about a lot here on the show, on the Active Life, and that is the importance of exercise.

Jeff Harding:
Resistance training especially.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. If you can improve your muscle strength, your balance, and your coordination, you're less likely to fall and break a bone. If we're preserving bone mass specifically, experts say that weight-bearing exercises are best. That includes things like jogging, hiking, playing sports like basketball or tennis, or any workout in which your body has to work against gravity to bear your body weight. That's a good thing. If you're a swimmer or a cyclist, the recommendation is not to stop those sports. Those are great events, great exercises that you can and should do but they say that you might want to add some resistance training to your workout as well. And if you can do all those things then Osteoporosis is, they say, preventable and avoidable, things that we need to be aware of, not just for the women but also for the men as well.

Jeff Harding:
So I've got a question for you.

Kyle Case:
Yes.

Jeff Harding:
Is pitching horseshoes considered resistance training?

Kyle Case:
That is a great question and we have an expert-

Jeff Harding:
Do you think anyone might know the answer to that?

Kyle Case:
... in the studio today, one of our amazing athletes at the Huntsman World Senior Games, Dennis Awsumb. Dennis pitches horseshoes at the Huntsman World Senior Games and we're glad to welcome you. I'm glad that you could join us today. Thanks, Dennis.

Dennis Awsumb:
Oh, thank you. I'm not here because I have that disease, am I?

Kyle Case:
Osteoporosis? I hope not.

Jeff Harding:
I have no knowledge. [inaudible 00:07:04] the doctors from telling us anything about you when we called them, so we don't know anything about it.

Kyle Case:
No, I hope not and I hope that you're able to avoid it a hundred percent but thanks for joining us today.

Dennis Awsumb:
Thank you.

Kyle Case:
We're looking forward to visiting with you and talking a little bit about some of your experiences in sports and living the Active Life and specifically in the Huntsman World Senior Games. So you do pitch horseshoes.

Dennis Awsumb:
I pitch horseshoes. That's correct.

Kyle Case:
So let's talk just a little bit about horseshoes specifically as it relates to the Huntsman World Senior Games. Have you always pitched horseshoes by the way?

Dennis Awsumb:
Just as a family reunion type thing. You throw a couple on a weekend thing. Nothing serious. And when we decided to move down here, I decided, "I want to get into one of the Huntsman Games [crosstalk 00:07:49]." So I looked through the booklet and I knew I couldn't play basketball, or run a marathon or whatever and I saw the word "horseshoes" and I thought, "That's my sport right there."

Kyle Case:
You found it.

Dennis Awsumb:
So I've been playing for four years since we've lived down here. So I just started when we moved down here.

Kyle Case:
Awesome. And at the games, there are different skill levels, and there are different age groups, there are different distances that people pitch from. Tell us a little bit about the type of horseshoes that you're pitching.

Dennis Awsumb:
That's correct. The beauty of the Senior Games is you play within your category. You play within your level, your percent level, and you play within your age level as well. So it makes it fair. You're not going to play somebody that's a top player. You're going to play somebody that's within your category.

Kyle Case:
Unless you are a top player. In which case ...

Dennis Awsumb:
Well, I'm not a top player. I watch the top players play.

Jeff Harding:
Correct me if I'm wrong but don't we break it down by ringer percentage?

Dennis Awsumb:
Yes, we do. That's correct.

Jeff Harding:
So you're actually going to pitch against somebody that's at your skill level, not just your age group.

Dennis Awsumb:
That's correct. Uh-huh (affirmative). Right.

Kyle Case:
So define that term "ringer percentage" for someone who doesn't know what that means.

Dennis Awsumb:
Oh, it's based on how many ringers you throw. Let's say you're a 10% thrower. That means if you've thrown a hundred shoes, you would have thrown ten ringers. And you play enough in games that you know what your ringer percentage. You have to sign up for the National Horseshoe Association and that can establish your ringer percentage.

Kyle Case:
And of course the ringer ... I mean not to dumb it down so much but if you're wholly unfamiliar with the sport of horseshoes, you're throwing a horseshoe, which is in the shape of a U. You're throwing it at a stake that is either 30 yards or 40 yards.

Dennis Awsumb:
Yeah, that's correct. Right.

Kyle Case:
Either 30 or 40 depending on your age group and where you're at. And a ringer is when you get that U to stay on that ring, that stake.

Dennis Awsumb:
Right around the pole. That's correct. It's good to be around the pole so the two ends of it are on the other side of the pole, basically. And that's worth three points if you throw a ringer.

Kyle Case:
So let's talk about scoring then. So if you throw a ringer, that's worth three points. How else do you score in horseshoes?

Dennis Awsumb:
If your shoe is closest to the pole ... basically the size of the shoe from side to side ... that's one point. So you can get six points if you threw two ringers, one on top of another. Or you could get four points, or you could get two points, or you get one point.

Kyle Case:
So you're throwing two horseshoes per turn, right?

Dennis Awsumb:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kyle Case:
And you're throwing down at the stake and then your opponent is facing you and throwing down at a stake that's by your feet.

Dennis Awsumb:
That's correct. You're going to throw your two shoes and then he's going to throw his two shoes after it. And then you walk down and see [crosstalk 00:10:30]-

Kyle Case:
What the score is.

Dennis Awsumb:
Because it's a cancellation out. Only one person scores. So you can cancel the other guy out. If he throws a ringer, you can throw one on top of him and it cancels both ringers out and the next closest would be the point for that.

Kyle Case:
So I misspoke. You're standing on the same side.

Dennis Awsumb:
That's correct.

Kyle Case:
You're pitching all the shoes down. All four of the shoes are down there. Then that's how you score it.

Dennis Awsumb:
That's correct.

Kyle Case:
Okay. Excellent. Very, very good. You're listening to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life and we're visiting with Huntsman World Senior Games athlete, Dennis Awsumb. He is a horseshoe pitcher at the Huntsman World Senior Games. And I'm going to, in full disclosure, say that I know Dennis because he's played against my dad at the Huntsman World Senior Games and they've kind of struck up a little bit of a friendship. My dad is actually out of the country. He's serving a religious mission right now and so won't be able to come and play this year.

Kyle Case:
But my dad's story's very similar to yours. I was kind of harping at my parents for several years, "Pick a sport, pick a sport. It doesn't matter what it is. Just do something." And he looked at the list and thought, "Hey, horseshoes. There's the one I can do." He grew up with my grandpa actually pitching horseshoes. I remember as a young boy going over to my grandma and grandpa's house and they had a makeshift horseshoe pit that my grandpa threw at. What was amazing about my grandpa that I always just thought was so cool is that he was legally blind. And he used a cane to get around. And he could kind of vaguely see shapes and stuff. But he definitely couldn't see the post when he was pitching horseshoes but he just got a rhythm and he was a pretty good horseshoe pitcher.

Dennis Awsumb:
Once you throw enough, you could actually close your eyes and still get close to the stake and just get the feel for how far it is.

Kyle Case:
And that's what happened with my grandpa. He was able to do that and so I know that my dad watched that in his dad. And so when he got the chance to pitch a little bit at the Games, I think he's really enjoyed it.

Dennis Awsumb:
And he's good. He's really good. He's moved way up in the status, too. He's hard to pitch against.

Kyle Case:
He's had a lot of fun. He's had a lot of fun. So we've been talking about horseshoes a little bit. You mentioned that you just kind of pitch horseshoes at family reunions, which I think is many people's introduction to the sport.

Dennis Awsumb:
Correct.

Kyle Case:
You've humbly indicated that maybe your percentage ringer isn't where you want it to be. But do people actually get up into the 90 and 100th percenters?

Dennis Awsumb:
Well, the World Horseshoe champion, which everything is based on, he pitches about 87%. That means out of 10 shoes he's thrown, 8 are ringers. And the other two probably were ringers but maybe somebody knocked them off.

Kyle Case:
Right. So I'm just going to say, I've pitched with my dad a little bit. We've just had fun at family reunions, just as you said. And it feels like you should be able to throw more ringers. It feels like you should-

Dennis Awsumb:
Until you try and do it.

Kyle Case:
Until you actually try to do it. And it's harder than you think.

Dennis Awsumb:
It is harder but it's really fun to try to get better at it. That's the fun part is trying to get better at it.

Kyle Case:
I agree. It really is. I have been very frustrated in thinking, "Okay, it's just I can see it, I can swing my arm. I should be able to throw these ringers," and not been able to do so. But there is a very fun element in that striving to try to hit those ringers, I agree.

Jeff Harding:
I thought the same way with basketball. I have the ball in my hand. I can see the hoop up there but getting the ball through the hoop-

Kyle Case:
It seems like you should be able to throw that ball in there, right?

Jeff Harding:
It's a whole different story, yeah.

Kyle Case:
So aside from horseshoes, Dennis, tell us a little bit about other sports that you've participated in your life.

Dennis Awsumb:
Well, I was on the swim team in high school and I did some running, spent some time in the army, did PT in the army, and did a little bit of running, ran a marathon. You only have to run one in your lifetime and I've done my one.

Kyle Case:
[crosstalk 00:14:20].

Dennis Awsumb:
That's right. It's checked off. Played a lot of softball in church organizations. And we have some bicycles at our house, so I ride my bike almost every night just kind of around the block and I have one mountain bike and [crosstalk 00:14:36]-

Kyle Case:
Of course, where you live, there's a lot of hills, so that's not an easy ride.

Dennis Awsumb:
No. It is a little uphill.

Kyle Case:
I love that approach that you're just describing to the Active Life and it sounds like you've just been able to be varied in your approach to trying to get a little bit of exercise here and there. And of course, I think we all feel like we want to do a little bit more and maybe we should set aside a little bit more time. But what you've described, I think, is a perfect example of a great way to just stay active and just participate and engage in a variety of different activities.

Dennis Awsumb:
And I think doing different activities is a good variety of stuff, too. I love to play horseshoes but I like to do other things as well.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, kind of keeps the boredom away and allows you to kind of just enjoy the outdoors and being active, getting that heart rate up just a little bit. It's definitely the way to live the Active Life. We talk a lot about the cross-training and just that variety that I think adds a little bit of spice to the training and really to our lives.

Dennis Awsumb:
Yeah, I agree. Definitely.

Kyle Case:
So I'm curious. It sounds like you've participated in sports for most of your life at different levels and a variety of different things. What's one of the things that sports have taught you?

Dennis Awsumb:
Oh, to not be a bad sport, I guess. And to try harder, to try to pitch better, and try to ride the bike further, and try to run faster. You just feel good when you do stuff like that.

Kyle Case:
Great life lessons that we learn from sports, right, and from youth on up. And some of us continue to strive to try to learn those life lessons. I love that concept of good sportsmanship.

Dennis Awsumb:
The team aspect, too. That's what's really fun is to be on a team.

Jeff Harding:
Associating with other individuals.

Kyle Case:
And we see that at the Huntsman World Senior Games, both aspects that you're talking about, the teamwork part with our softball teams, our volleyball teams, basketball teams, we see that. We see those lessons played out across people's lifetimes, not only just as kids but as adults as well. And then that idea, that concept, of sportsmanship, where you want to see just a collection of amazing individuals that come together to just have fun and play the sport. Come on out and check out the Huntsman World Senior Games. I think that you'll be impressed with that.

Jeff Harding:
Now we've talked about many times in the past the Huntsman World Senior Games is more than just competition. So Dennis, what's some of your favorite things that happen outside of competition at the Huntsman World Senior Games?

Dennis Awsumb:
Well, we play horseshoes every Thursday at Snow Park and we welcome anyone to come and play with us. And so we have people that come just on Thursday to play. You don't have to be professional. So there are other ways to get in an activity besides just being in the Huntsman Games. You can start simple and eventually work into playing in the Huntsman Games.

Kyle Case:
And I think for those who are listening outside of the area as well, in many city parks, regardless of the city that you're at, you're going to find horseshoe pits.

Dennis Awsumb:
Correct.

Kyle Case:
And the barrier to entry in horseshoes is very low. It's very easy to get into it and the more you do it, the better you get at it, of course.

Dennis Awsumb:
Right, exactly.

Kyle Case:
But just the ease of entry into the sport is very attractive and makes it a [crosstalk 00:18:07] sport.

Dennis Awsumb:
I carry horseshoes in the trunk of my car.

Kyle Case:
Just in case.

Dennis Awsumb:
You never know when we'll be in a park and I'll throw a couple of shoes.

Jeff Harding:
It's also great if you happen to get snow because it gets you a little bit more weight back there to help you with the traction, too.

Kyle Case:
So much help. So much help.

Dennis Awsumb:
That's true. If you play in the snow, you have to have horseshoes painted black so you can see them.

Kyle Case:
There you go. There you go. Yeah, my dad does the same thing. He always carries his horseshoes with him. Obviously, as I said, he's out of the country now but we regularly would find a park, whether we're visiting family at a reunion or whatever and we'd go and pitch and just have a great time with it.

Dennis Awsumb:
Whenever I traveled with my family, we'd always stop at parks. The kids would get restless in the car and we'd find a park in every town. The kids would get out and run around. That was a good exercise for the kids. And I think they all do that today with their kids now.

Kyle Case:
Tons of fun. Tons of fun. Now Jeff had mentioned that at the Huntsman World Senior Games we do have the sporting events. We also have the socials and the opening ceremonies, those kinds of things. Is there a memory for you that stands out over the last several years of competing, whether it's the competition itself or one of these extracurricular events?

Dennis Awsumb:
Well, we have a social dinner I guess you could say or luncheon after your sport is done and that's fun just to socialize with the other athletes and talk to them and discuss how you did and how they did and that's just fun. And you see the same people every year so it's fun to reminiscence with those people from year to year, too.

Kyle Case:
Kind of like a little family reunion, isn't it?

Dennis Awsumb:
Yeah, exactly.

Kyle Case:
We hear that so often from our athletes, the athletes that come. Many times we hear that they come for the first year because they heard the competition is pretty good and that's the reason that they sign up and participate that first year. The second year, though, they come back for the friendships and the comradery.

Dennis Awsumb:
That's true.

Kyle Case:
And what you've described is what we hear over and over and over from our athletes, that opportunity to get together, to engage in the social aspect of the Games and also in the socials that we offer where you can come and have a meal, sit down with people who are interested and engaged in the same thing that you're interested in, and then see them year after year. And in some cases, that's the only time that you get to see them. And just build those friendships and those relationships. One of the real hallmarks of, I think, the success that I think the Games has had and one of the reasons why it's so near and dear to so many people as far as those who participate ... I feel like that's just an excellent benefit of competing and participating in the Huntsman World Senior Games.

Dennis Awsumb:
Oh yeah, I look forward to that at the end of the competition for sure.

Jeff Harding:
So Dennis, have you ever marched with the athletes in the parade of athletes?

Dennis Awsumb:
I have actually. I got to carry the flag one year for the horseshoe flag and our sponsor's flag one year, too. So that's a lot of fun to participate in that, too.

Kyle Case:
And that's at the opening ceremonies that we're talking about. We try to follow the example of the Olympics and we try to put together a ceremony that is fun, and upbeat, and energetic, and entertaining. We've got the singing and the dancing. We've got fireworks. We've got oftentimes an inspirational speaker that will come and share some motivation and some inspiration. And of course, there's that parade of athletes.

Dennis Awsumb:
Yeah, it's great to participate in that. A lot of fun.

Kyle Case:
I feel like that's one of the favorite things that the athletes appreciate ... seem to enjoy about the opening ceremonies.

Dennis Awsumb:
Yeah, it's a lot of fun. I enjoy it.

Kyle Case:
So you've gone to everyone since you've started competing. Is that right?

Dennis Awsumb:
Uh-huh (affirmative). Correct.

Kyle Case:
Awesome. Awesome. Any other memories or things that stand out to you as far as participation in the Games?

Dennis Awsumb:
Oh, I think I mentioned quite a few. I just love to participate. It's just fun.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, well, and that's the great thing about the Games. And you alluded to this-

Dennis Awsumb:
Oh, I've got another idea. I like to go watch other sports, too. I like to go watch softball. That's a hoot to watch those little guys playing softball. It's really fun.

Kyle Case:
Absolutely. And when the games are going on in October, whether you're participating in that sport or in another sport, as Dennis is, there's plenty of softball going on. Yeah, this year we'll have over 350 softball teams that will compete at the Huntsman World Senior Games and that's a great one to go out and just spectate. And as you said, there are lots of other things that are going on.

Dennis Awsumb:
I always poke my head in at the Dixie Center, watch some basketball or volleyball. And some of the bike races go down by our house, so I usually go down to see them when they make their turnaround by our house. So yeah, I pick up other sports just to watch. It's fun.

Jeff Harding:
You are such an inspirational example of how to be an athlete at the Huntsman World Senior Games, Dennis. You really are.

Kyle Case:
It's true because just engaging fully in the sports as a spectator or as an athlete, I think, is really, again, one of the benefits of participating and being a part of the Huntsman World Senior Games. Lots of good stuff that goes on and we'd love to invite anyone that is listening to come and participate, whether as a volunteer, as an athlete, as a spectator. Lots of good things that are going on.

Jeff Harding:
I just need to throw this in. Dennis' wife, Colleen, is one of the directors of our gift shop and she does a great job and we love having her there. So she's a volunteer but she's busier than a lot of athletes are during the Games.

Kyle Case:
Absolutely. We couldn't do it without our volunteers. That is for sure. Well Dennis, thank you so much for joining us today-

Dennis Awsumb:
Well, thanks for having me. I appreciate it.

Kyle Case:
... for sharing some of your experiences and we look forward to seeing you pitching some horseshoes at the Games this year.

Dennis Awsumb:
Okay, I'll be there.

Kyle Case:
Awesome. Jeff?

Jeff Harding:
Yes, Kyle.

Kyle Case:
It's June.

Jeff Harding:
That's what the calendar says. You're right.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, we're about halfway through June.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, we are. It's crazy.

Kyle Case:
So you know what that means, right?

Jeff Harding:
It means it's time to get going.

Kyle Case:
It is time to register for the Huntsman World Senior Games. Registration is open. It's been open for a while. In fact, I ran a report just this morning. We already have over 6700 athletes that have registered, which is great for this time of year. If you're interested in being a part of the Huntsman World Senior Games and we hope that you're interested in being a part of the Huntsman World Senior Games, get registered. Get it on your calendar. Use that as motivation to really live the Active Life this year. It's very easy to do. All you have to do is visit seniorgames.net and click on "register". The process is simple, it's fast, it's secure, and before you know it, you'll be ready to become one of our more than 11,000 athletes who will compete this year at the games. The dates for the 2019 Huntsman World Senior Games are October 7th through the 19th, so put those on your calendar.

Jeff Harding:
Definitely, do that today.

Kyle Case:
And again, there are opportunities there whether you're an athlete or not, to get engaged. You can register as a volunteer and there are lots of opportunities for volunteering at the sports. If you're not so interested in sports, there are other areas where you can participate as a volunteer as well and seniorgames.net is where you find that, too. Remember to tune in life next and every Thursday at 5:30 p.m. mountain time on AM 1450 or FM 93.1 for the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. You can also subscribe to our podcast anywhere that podcasts are found. Once you've subscribed, give us a rating, write a quick review. You can really make a difference in helping us spread the word. And you can find this as well as previous shows right on our website as well. Again, that is seniorgames.net. Our inspirational quote for the day comes from former President Theodore Roosevelt. He said, "Courage is not having the strength to go on. It's going on when you don't have the strength."

Jeff Harding:
That's right.

Kyle Case:
Until next Thursday, stay active. Bye, everyone.