Today, Kyle and Jeff talk about several “silent” heart-attack signs that you really ought to be aware of. It’s information that might save your life or the life of someone you love. We also visit with professional triathlete Jen Speildenner. We talk about mental toughness and what it takes to take your sport to the next level. Go and check it Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life Podcast

 

Kyle Case:
Hello, and welcome to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. My name was Kyle Case, and I'll be your host on this amazing journey, as we attempt to help you get the most out of your life. Joining me in the studio today is my copilot, Jeff Harding. Jeff, how's your heart today?

Jeff Harding:
How's my heart today?

Kyle Case:
How is your heart today?

Jeff Harding:
You threw a curve at me.

Kyle Case:
You thought I was just going to say how are you doing today?

Jeff Harding:
Yeah, my heart is fine, as far as I know. I haven't had it checked in a while, but as far as I know, it's beating and getting blood to all parts of my body so it's doing okay.

Kyle Case:
Well, that's exactly what you want your heart to do.

Jeff Harding:
And how's your heart doing Kyle?

Kyle Case:
It's doing great. Thank you.

Jeff Harding:
Well great.

Kyle Case:
Thanks for asking. Yeah. The heart, it's pretty important.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah. I'm kind of attached to it.

Kyle Case:
You need one of those things working the right way inside of you.

Jeff Harding:
Only if you want to be alive.

Kyle Case:
Only if you want to live, right? Well, today I want to talk a little bit about heart health. And specifically, Jeff, I want to talk about seven silent signs of a heart attack.

Jeff Harding:
Well, if they're silent, how do you know they're there?

Kyle Case:
Well, I'm going to tell you.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
I'm going to tell you, and then you'll know.

Jeff Harding:
Oh, so they're not really silent, it's just that we kind of ignore them.

Kyle Case:
They're silent because they don't make noises.

Jeff Harding:
Kind of ignores them. Okay.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. So I'm going to tell you what they are. And then when you'll be like, oh-

Jeff Harding:
It's like when your grandkid's-

Kyle Case:
... now I get it.

Jeff Harding:
It's like when your grandkid's upstairs, and you can't hear them, that's when you'd worried about them.

Kyle Case:
You know there's something bad going on, right?

Jeff Harding:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Kyle Case:
Here's the thing, Jeff, more than 1 million Americans suffer a heart attack every single year.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
And there are some traditional symptoms that most of us are familiar with, chest pain, pressure, cold sweat, extreme weakness. Those are things that we kind of know about-

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
... from a heart attack standpoint. But there are more subtle signs you're having or are about to have a heart attack that is very easy to miss.

Jeff Harding:
Okay?

Kyle Case:
And noticing these heart attack signs early, and then getting prompt treatment can really be important. And can even potentially save your life. So these are things that are important. The problem is that it's a little bit tricky because any one of these symptoms doesn't necessarily mean that you will have a heart attack or-

Jeff Harding:
Of course if you them multiple you might want to be careful.

Kyle Case:
Well, all of them are things that you need to listen to.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
Right?

Jeff Harding:
Right. Right.

Kyle Case:
So here's the list. Listen to the list, then listen to your body. And by the way, this is all according to an article that I found in the Reader's Digest by Alyssa Joung. Number one, fatigue. Are you having a heart attack, Jeff?

Jeff Harding:
Well, not right now, but I do every night if that's the case.

Kyle Case:
At the end of the day, you're feeling fatigued.

Jeff Harding:
Yes. Yes.

Kyle Case:
Dr. Stacy E. Rosen is a Go Red for Women cardiologist at North Shore Healthcare System. She says this is one of the most common symptoms that she sees, especially in women heart attack patients. Experts say that people on the verge of a heart attack report feeling tired, and not able to do their usual activities. During a heart attack, blood flow to the heart is reduced, which puts extra stress on the muscle, which makes you feel exhausted. And if you're feeling extreme fatigue, and you're not used to that, that's something that you ought to at least be aware of.

Jeff Harding:
Okay.

Kyle Case:
Number two, soreness in the back, arm, or chest.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
So noticeable pain or soreness in the back, arm, or chest area, is often a silent heart attack sign. As MyHeartSisters.org explains, when heart muscles cells begin to run out of oxygen during a heart attack, because of a blocked artery, which prevents oxygenated blood from feeding into that muscle, they began to send off pain signals throughout the nervous system.

Kyle Case:
Your brain may confuse those nerve signals with signals coming from your arm, or your jaw, your shoulder, your elbow, your neck, or your upper back, because of the nerve proximity. And because the pain is often not accompanied by that typical chest heaviness that we hear about that's associated with heart attacks, people do have a tendency to ignore that. But if that symptom, that pain in your arm, your jaw, your shoulder, your elbow, it's unexplained, if it's something new, that's worrisome, and you ought to consider taking this seriously.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
And potentially seeing a doctor. The next one, shortness of breath. If a flight of stairs is usually no problem for you, but suddenly you find yourself gasping for air at the top of the stairs, it potentially could signal a heart attack.

Jeff Harding:
Sure.

Kyle Case:
Women especially notice when walking up steps or carrying groceries, feeling fatigued or breathless when they normally wouldn't. Also, if you feel short of breath right after you wake up, that's not a good sign.

Jeff Harding:
Nope.

Kyle Case:
It's a sign that something could be wrong. The heart plays a key role in transporting oxygen to the rest of your body and removing carbon dioxide from the tissues, so blocked blood flow to the heart could affect your breathing. If you don't normally find yourself out of breath, and all of a sudden you're getting out of breath, that's something that you ought to be aware of and maybe get it checked out.

Jeff Harding:
Right. Go see the doctor.

Kyle Case:
Another one, heartburn or belching. If you have occasional heartburn after you eat a heavy pizza lunch, that's not necessarily something you need to worry about.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
But if it's out of the ordinary or heartburn has never bothered you before, and all of a sudden you're having it, it may be a signal of a heart attack. Angina is heartburn-like chest pain. It's caused by lack of blood flow to the heart, and that is what happens during a heart attack. So again, by itself, not necessarily something crazy. But if it's out of the ordinary, something you need to be aware of. And then, a couple of other things really quickly, an upset stomach. Again, all by itself, not necessarily an indicator, but heart attack symptoms can sometimes mimic stomach problems like nausea, vomiting, or overall GI upset.

Kyle Case:
This is again, once again, especially in women. If you don't feel well, call your doctor. It may be that you ate too many tacos.

Jeff Harding:
If you did that probably, that could be the case. Yes.

Kyle Case:
But it also could be a silent symptom of a heart attack, which could turn out to be pretty catastrophic. So as always, it's better safe than sorry.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
They also say throat, neck, or jaw discomfort. If you have unexplained discomfort of the neck, or jaw, or tightness in the throat, that you've never before, that can indicate a heart attack. You should immediately contact your doctor. It's especially important for people with diabetes to pay attention to the subtle changes like this because they sometimes have trouble feeling sensations. They're less likely to feel the typical symptoms like chest pain. So if you're diabetic, and you're feeling some of these things that we've talked about, it's worth taking it seriously.

Jeff Harding:
Sure.

Kyle Case:
Just getting it checked out. The last thing is the overall feeling that something's wrong. And doctors have found that many heart attack patients oftentimes say that they had just this feeling of doom like something's just not right.

Jeff Harding:
Anxiety.

Kyle Case:
And they recommend listening to that little voice in your head. If something feels off, it's always better to be overly cautious and call a doctor. Some patients have also reported feeling less mentally sharp right before a heart attack. And again, Jeff, as I said, any one of these things by themselves doesn't necessarily mean you need to panic.

Jeff Harding:
Right.

Kyle Case:
That you're having a heart attack. But if these things are out of the ordinary, if you're not used to feeling these things, again, it's better safe than sorry.

Jeff Harding:
Right. Right.

Kyle Case:
So get it checked out.

Jeff Harding:
That's a good plan.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, and on that happy note.

Jeff Harding:
I'm feeling so excited.

Kyle Case:
Let's shift gears a little bit. We're going to introduce our guest today. Jeff, I'm very excited to introduce our guest, Jeff. Jen Spieldenner is joining us. She's a professional triathlete.

Jeff Harding:
Yes, she is.

Kyle Case:
She says that she grew up swimming in middle school because a boy that she liked was a swimmer.

Jeff Harding:
Oh my goodness.

Kyle Case:
And then she continued to run in high school because her best friend ran. But she did her first triathlon in 2003 as a senior in high school. And she found her sport. She went on to be a member of the national team from 2004 to 2012. She did her first Half Iron Man in 2012. And since then she has won four of the 70.3-mile distance races. Last October, she won her first Iron Man in Louisville, and she'll be racing in Kona in October. Jan, welcome to the show, we're glad you could join us.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah, thanks for having me. I'm going to have to correct you. I got into running because of a boy.

Jeff Harding:
Oh.

Kyle Case:
Oh.

Jen Spieldenner:
I grew up swimming. But there was a really cute boy in eighth grade, and he ran the distance. So, then I was-

Jeff Harding:
So you had to chase him.

Jen Spieldenner:
Of course. Yes. Yes. And I ran the distance.

Kyle Case:
And did you chase him or beat him?

Jen Spieldenner:
I feel like he was quicker, but it was super fun to always-

Jeff Harding:
Did you ever catch him?

Jen Spieldenner:
No.

Kyle Case:
No.

Jeff Harding:
No.

Kyle Case:
So whatever gets you into sports, right?

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes. Yes.

Kyle Case:
Whatever gets you to live in that active life? Whatever it was, in junior high or whenever it is that's the important thing is trying to get out there and be active.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Obviously, you found your own course, you discovered triathlon. I think that most of our listeners probably know what a triathlon is. But for those that maybe don't understand what the trip means, let's talk a little bit about the basics. What is a triathlon?

Jen Spieldenner:
So a triathlon is three events. It's swimming, biking, and running. And it can be in a variety of different distances. There's the sprint, Olympic, Half Iron Man, Iron Man. And then there's even distances kind of in between all those. So like do you want me to give this-

Kyle Case:
Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely.

Jen Spieldenner:
Like a sprint would be around a 750-meter swim, 12 miles, or 20k bike. And then a 5K or 3.1-mile run. An Olympic would be double a sprint.

Kyle Case:
So about a 1500 meter swim-

Jen Spieldenner:
40K.

Kyle Case:
... 40K. And then a 10K at the end.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes. And then a Half Iron Man is a 1.2-mile swim, 56-mile bike, and then a half marathon, so 13.1 miles. And then a full Iron Man is double that. So, yeah.

Kyle Case:
And I think it's worth noting, again, I think most people probably understand this, but these events are done back, to back, to back.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
It's not like one day you wake up and say I'm going to swim a really, really long way.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Then I'm going to take a week off, and then I'm going to come back and ride my bike. Like these events are all done back to back. And you always start with the swim.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes. You always start with the swim, and then you go into the bike.

Kyle Case:
The bike is in the middle.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes. And then the run. And then you have like your little T1, which is in between the swim and the bike and then T2, which would be in between the bike and the run.

Jeff Harding:
And those stand for transitions.

Kyle Case:
Your transitions. Right?

Jeff Harding:
Your transitions. Yes.

Kyle Case:
And that, for amateurs, that's where many people might lose a lot of their overall time because they're tired, they want to take a break, they sit down, they get a drink, whatever it is. For professionals, you really practice on those transitions.

Jen Spieldenner:
Oh, 100%. When I first got into triathlon, I would put a piece of gum in T1, in my transition one, because I'd want a fresh piece after the swim-

Kyle Case:
Right.

Jen Spieldenner:
It could get nasty swimming in the water. And I remember the coach I had at the time, he was like, what are you doing? And I was like, it's a fresh piece of gum.

Kyle Case:
I'm just opening up my gum, I'm putting it in my mouth.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah. And I was laying it out before the race, and he was like, no, no, no, no, no. We don't do this. So no 100%, like you have your shoes clipped, like your bike shoes on your bike. And you put them in place with rubber bands. So you're able to jump on your bike, and you can put your shoes on while riding. And yeah, like, I mean you're talking 30 seconds in transition.

Kyle Case:
Seconds.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah, yeah. Not, Yes. And it does matter because I have won races and loss races by two seconds. So it does matter.

Kyle Case:
Wow.

Jeff Harding:
Wow.

Jen Spieldenner:
In a Half Iron Man, too which is like a four hour plus day.

Kyle Case:
So I want to focus just a little bit on the distances. You specialize in the Half Iron Man. Is that fair to say?

Jen Spieldenner:
I do now. Yeah. Yes, yes. 100%.

Kyle Case:
And so you've done full Iron Man.

Jen Spieldenner:
I've just done one.

Kyle Case:
Just done one. But I think it's easy to kind of throw those numbers out there as abstracts, and it's hard to kind of wrap your head around it. But those are long distances.

Jen Spieldenner:
Oh, yes.

Kyle Case:
It's an incredibly grueling day when you're racing a Half Iron Man or a full Iron Man. It's worth noting, it's 1.2 swims, right?

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
So 1.2 miles swimming is a long, long way to swim.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah. I mean.

Kyle Case:
No. It is. It is.

Jen Spieldenner:
It's more the bike and the run that is over. The marathon, when I did the Iron Man was the part that was super overwhelming for me.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Jen Spieldenner:
I had never run over 18, 19 miles in my entire life. So that was a hard thing for me to wrap my mind around that I was going to do that.

Kyle Case:
At the end of a very-

Jen Spieldenner:
I know.

Kyle Case:
... long swim and 100-mile bike ride.

Jen Spieldenner:
112-mile bike ride.

Kyle Case:
112 mile-

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
... bike, not another bike ride, a bike race. It's worth noting you're racing.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes. No, you are racing and it is-

Kyle Case:
Wow.

Jen Spieldenner:
I still remember my coach sending me a text the night before. I said I'm all ready to go. And he just said, "Just focus. You need to stay focused the whole time." And I think that's very hard when you're going along that long. Like you're racing.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Jen Spieldenner:
You're racing for four-plus hours or you're racing for eight, nine hours. You need to be focused and that's, yeah, I almost rode my bike off the side of the road in Louisville because I lost focus-

Kyle Case:
Wow.

Jen Spieldenner:
... for a second in mile 105.

Jeff Harding:
So what does one think about during these long bike rides and runs?

Kyle Case:
Yeah. How do you stay focused for eight hours, four and a half hours, whatever race you're doing?

Jen Spieldenner:
I think it like ebbs and flows. Like there are times that it's easy to focus. And there are times that it's not. And it's just bringing your attention to the present. What you're presently doing,

Jeff Harding:
so you're thinking about, okay, I've got to run, I have a competitor back here, I have a person in front of me that I'm trying to catch. I mean, those kinds of thoughts going through your mind, strategic thoughts?

Jen Spieldenner:
Sometimes. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I think it's important to note, especially when you're on the bike you shouldn't be thinking like, "Oh my goodness, I have to run a half marathon or have to run a marathon after that." That is not what you should be thinking.

Jeff Harding:
No. I would concur with that.

Jen Spieldenner:
You should just be thinking about doing the best that you can at the moment-

Jeff Harding:
The moment that you're in.

Jen Spieldenner:
... to get yourself through the miles that you're riding. And like I have learned with doing the half's and the full, just one full, but there are a lot of like ups and downs because you are going so long. There's going to be times that you don't feel good. There'll be times that you feel great. And it's just kind of riding that rollercoaster and not getting super emotional when you feel terrible or getting way too excited when you feel great. I think too, I can be an emotional racer, and I know like when I see my family it's like, oh, I get super excited and if I'm doing well I want to like the hustle and go faster.

Jeff Harding:
Yeah. You just keep your pace.

Jen Spieldenner:
You need to keep to your plan and stick to your, yeah, stick to your pace.

Kyle Case:
That's awesome. I loved what you said. Do the best that you can do at the moment that you're in. I think that's good advice for sports, and I think that's good advice for life.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
For sure. You're listening to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. And we're visiting with Jen Spieldenner, a professional triathlete. We're talking about triathlons in general. I'm curious, you've done this for how many years now, Jen?

Jen Spieldenner:
Too many. I guess I did my first in '03. I basically was a professional right away. But I went to college. When I graduated college in '08 then I've done it full time. So this is my 11th year doing it full time.

Kyle Case:
So you've been very ingrained in the culture. Obviously, you've seen a lot of ups and probably some downs as well throughout that whole process. What has the sport of triathlon taught you that one day when you hang up your running shoes and your goggles, you'll look back on and say, I'm so glad I did that because this is what I've learned?

Jen Spieldenner:
I think resiliency. I think it's 100% taught me that I'm a lot stronger than I ever thought. You are stronger than you ever think you are. And it's just all about pushing forward and doing your best and never giving up. Like I think this sport has knocked me down through injury, through poor performances, but it's also taught me that I have all the tools, and I have great people around me that I'm able to pick myself back up and keep going.

Kyle Case:
What a valuable lesson-

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah. I think, 100%.

Kyle Case:
... as well. I, Jen, want to make this clear. I am not a triathlete. I don't consider myself a triathlete, but I've done a couple of triathlons. And there's a difference I think between someone who is a triathlete and someone who's done a couple of triathlons. I've done a couple of triathlons. And I would agree that for me that was, I think the thing that I learned was you can do more than you think that you can do.

Jen Spieldenner:
100%.

Kyle Case:
And what a valuable lesson and I think that many, many sports can teach us that, whether that's tennis, or distance running, or archery shooting, whatever it happens to be. I think that when you get into it and you recognize the skill set that you're working on, and you're trying to improve on and you look at the progress that you've made, which I think is very important, tracking your progress, understanding where you started, where you are now. I think all of those things can lead you to that concept of, wow, I didn't realize I was this great. Is that fair to say?

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah, it is interesting because I tend to be super critical of myself, and super hard on myself. So it's funny because I always tend to look at the negative things like what I didn't do well versus what I did do well. And that's something that I'm trying to do better with is just cutting myself a little bit of grace.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Jen Spieldenner:
Patting myself on the back when I do a good job because I think it is important to reward yourself when you do something well, and not beat yourself up too much when you don't do something well. Just learn from it, pick yourself back up and then just keep moving forward.

Kyle Case:
Well, and I think for you as a professional athlete that, that level of expectation and demand that you put on yourself, that's what has driven you. That's something that maybe sets you apart from the casual athlete or the casual triathlete. So there's something to that for sure. That's been part of your success. At the same time, I agree with you, I think it's so important you do give yourself a pat on the back and recognize where you are, and where you came from and how much you've done, and little victories. That's what it's all about.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
So I want to ask you, you've done this for a long time, you've done a lot of races. What's maybe one race that stands out to you as just everything came together, and you look back on it and say that was my race, that was the one?

Jen Spieldenner:
I mean it's going to have to be Louisville. My first Iron Man. Everyone was there. My parents, my husband. The guy that got me into triathlon. It was not a perfect day. It was super miserable. It was maybe in the upper 40s and raining. Very-

Kyle Case:
The Upper 40s?

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah. Low 40s.

Kyle Case:
And you're swimming.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah, the bike was super miserable.

Kyle Case:
Biking, running in the rain.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
Sounds miserable.

Jen Spieldenner:
It was. Just those are the things I thrive in. I like when things are very tough. Those are my type of races. I didn't really have like a big buildup for that race. In the prep for that race, I fell more in love with the sport than I have been in a long time. I think the unknown, not having expectations because, yes, I've done this sport a long time. I didn't know what to expect.

Kyle Case:
This was a brand new distance for you.

Jen Spieldenner:
I just wanted to finish. That's all I wanted to do. I definitely wasn't thinking that I was going to win. But then when I was in that position, 100% I wanted to win. But it was a special day. Like I don't know. I think people can, when they do their first full, if they do that, or they do something that really challenges them, it's rewarding. I think back to that day and there's just so many different little moments that are really special. So yeah.

Kyle Case:
Well, what a great memory, and again, great lessons that sports can teach us about life, and our capability, our potential.

Jeff Harding:
So just a quick question. When you saw yourself in the position to win, did you find an adrenaline rush that helped you maintain, I mean, sometimes I've seen people grab defeat out of the jaws of victory because they, I don't know, they let go, they lose contraction. Do you find that little extra something when the goal's insight? If there maybe was somebody pushing you a little bit, do you find just a little extra oomph?

Jen Spieldenner:
Oh, 100%, 100% yeah. And I got off the bike with maybe an eight-minute lead. And it was between three of us, and those girls were closing on the run. But yeah, no, they definitely were pushing me, but I was not going to give up or surrender that.

Jeff Harding:
No.

Jen Spieldenner:
Especially like at mile 20 of the run. I mean, I don't know if anybody has felt this, but your quad start to shred-

Kyle Case:
Yeah. That's the wall, right?

Jen Spieldenner:
... off the bone.

Kyle Case:
That's where you just run into this.

Jen Spieldenner:
I've never.

Kyle Case:
Wow.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah. Just the distance. I don't know if that was, it's more mental then, at that point, it was all mental. The body was, yeah just-

Kyle Case:
Starting to shut down. So you called-

Jen Spieldenner:
Oh, yes.

Kyle Case:
... upon your heart and your mind.

Jeff Harding:
But you found that little extra something that's just helped you keep going and fight through that-

Jen Spieldenner:
Oh yeah.

Jeff Harding:
... and win. Great.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah, because of 100%. When you're in the lead it's like I become a little bit slightly different from an athlete.

Kyle Case:
So you do know when you're out on the course there are clocks, and like you know, because in an Iron Man race it's an eight or nine-hour race, people are spread out-

Jen Spieldenner:
Oh, you know.

Kyle Case:
... over long distances. But you know.

Jen Spieldenner:
You know, because like for instance-

Kyle Case:
If you're in the front.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah. You know, because you also have a cyclist with you. That's behind you letting everyone know that you're the first pro-female.

Kyle Case:
Okay.

Jen Spieldenner:
But you also know. You know, because you just, yeah, you just know.

Kyle Case:
And that's where you find it. Right? That's where you find that. So I want to ask you this, you've been a professional triathlete. Most of us are not going to reach that level. But still, there are many opportunities to compete and participate in the sport of triathlon. What advice would you have for someone who's considering their first triathlon and is maybe on the fence?

Jen Spieldenner:
I think you should find a group of people that do a triathlon. There's has to be like a local tri club or maybe-

Jeff Harding:
Well, they're all over the place. There's the southern Utah tri club down here, in St. George.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah, that's-

Jeff Harding:
But there's also Salt Lake Tri Club in Salt Lake. So I know there are tri clubs all over the place.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah, I think having people around you that have done it, people to keep you accountable, meet up, teach you all their tricks. I think that would be a good step.

Kyle Case:
Do you feel like from a beginner standpoint, do you need to focus on one of the three areas or do you need to equally focus on it? Or is it an individual?

Jen Spieldenner:
I think most people that get into triathlon typically they have one or two of the disciplines that they're very strong at. So maybe they need to focus on the one that they're weak at. No, I don't. I mean, swimming, if you're not comfortable swimming, I think that's something to pay attention to. Swimming in open water can be very nerve-wracking. I'm a swimmer, I still can get sometimes nervous, but I've seen people be very, very yeah. So swimming maybe.

Kyle Case:
I will say on the couple that I did, swimming's my hard part. I am not a distance swimmer. I can swim across the pool. I'm pretty good at that. But-

Jeff Harding:
Well, if you get that one break halfway.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. When I hold onto the rope halfway through. But yeah, that to me was the big thing. I felt like if I was tired on the bike, I could get off the bike and walk. And if I was tired on the run I could always run slower or walk. But if you stop swimming, you have a tendency to just-

Jen Spieldenner:
Sink.

Kyle Case:
... sink.

Jen Spieldenner:
In most-

Jeff Harding:
If you sink long enough, you can walk.

Kyle Case:
That's true.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah, in most races too, if people are nervous, they do have kayakers every, you can grab onto a kayak or paddleboard. And you can also enter a race where you know the water's shallow enough where you can stand up at any point.

Jeff Harding:
[crosstalk 00:23:36].

Kyle Case:
And it's worth noting in the Huntsman World Senior Games, our triathlon is done in a swimming pool.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
And so we swim laps, but worst case scenario you're going to be safe and protected.

Jen Spieldenner:
Yes. Yes.

Kyle Case:
So if you're looking at it from that standpoint. Well awesome. Jen, thank you so much for joining us today. We appreciate your expertise.

Jeff Harding:
You've been a delight.

Jen Spieldenner:
Thank you.

Kyle Case:
Sharing your experiences with us. Best of luck in the future-

Jen Spieldenner:
Yeah. Thank you so much.

Kyle Case:
... and all the races that you have coming up.

Jen Spieldenner:
Thanks.

Kyle Case:
Jeff.

Jeff Harding:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
It is time.

Jeff Harding:
It is. I don't know what time it is. But it is definitely time.

Kyle Case:
Registration.

Jeff Harding:
Oh, it is registration.

Kyle Case:
Registration for the-

Jeff Harding:
Well, it's past time for registration.

Kyle Case:
... the Huntsman World Senior Games. Well, it's open and now's the time.

Jeff Harding:
That's true.

Kyle Case:
Now's the time. It opened up on March 1st. We already have well over 4,000 registered participants, which is a lot. We're anticipating about 11,000. So there's room.

Jeff Harding:
Not quite halfway there, but we're getting there.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. There's a room. If you're interested in being a part of the Huntsman World Senior Games this year, all you got to do is get registered. It's easy to do. Once you're registered, you can put it on your calendar. And then use that motivation to help you really live the active life during the rest of the year.

Jeff Harding:
That's right.

Kyle Case:
Registering is, as I said, super easy. Just visit SeniorGames.net. Click on register. The process is simple, it's fast, it's secure. And before you know what, you'll be ready to become one of our more than 11,000 athletes who will compete this year. The dates for the 2019 Huntsman World Senior Games are October 7th through the 19th, so a take a look at that. Put it on your calendar. Remember to tune in life next and every Thursday at 5:30 PM mountain time on AM 1450 or FM 93.1m for the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. And you can also subscribe to our podcast anywhere that podcasts are found.

Kyle Case:
Once you've subscribed, give us a rating, write a quick review. You can really make a difference in helping us spread the word about living the active life. You can also find this and previous shows right on our website, SeniorGames.net. Check that out. Jeff, our inspirational quote for the day-

Jeff Harding:
I'm ready.

Kyle Case:
... comes from one of my favorite musical artists, Jon Bon Jovi.

Jeff Harding:
Of course.

Kyle Case:
He says-

Jeff Harding:
Jump.

Kyle Case:
I don't want to live forever. I just want to live, while I'm alive.

Jeff Harding:
That's a good point.

Kyle Case:
Until next Thursday, stay active.

Jeff Harding:
Bye, everyone.