Kyle and Michelle talk about whether or not grilling at a Bar-B-Cue is bad for you. An appropriate topic for Independence Day. We love it. But is it causing us long-term health problems? Tune in to find out. We also visit with Allen Christensen, Health Promotion & Wellness Operations Manager at the LiVe Well Center, about longevity and how we can all live a longer, happier and healthier life. This is a good one. Check it out  Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life podcast.

 

Kyle Case:
Hello, and welcome to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. My name is Kyle Case, and I'll be your host on this amazing journey as we attempt to help you get the most out of your life. Joining me in the studio today, filling in for Jeff Harding is my copilot, Michelle Graves.

Kyle Case:
Michelle, how are you today?

Michelle Graves:
Hi Kyle, I'm great.

Kyle Case:
Good, good.

Michelle Graves:
It's a beautiful day.

Kyle Case:
Today's a big day.

Michelle Graves:
It is a big day.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, 4th of July.

Michelle Graves:
Happy Birthday, America.

Kyle Case:
That is right. Independence Day, the day when we celebrate so many good things in our lives, right?

Michelle Graves:
Yes, yes.

Kyle Case:
So today, in addition to, you know, the freedom, and just remembering those who have sacrificed for us to have the freedoms that we have today. Today is also one of the biggest barbecuing days of the year.

Michelle Graves:
I know.

Kyle Case:
You know that, right?

Michelle Graves:
Do you watch the hot dog eating contest? I must say that's the highlight of my year.

Kyle Case:
I don't watch it as an annual event, but I've seen it before. I know it's a big deal.

Michelle Graves:
It's a big deal.

Kyle Case:
It's incredible how many hotdogs they can put down at that level.

Michelle Graves:
And kind of disgusting.

Kyle Case:
And kind of disgusting.

Michelle Graves:
I'm sure makes for good TV.

Kyle Case:
Makes for good TV, for sure. Well, Michelle, many of our listeners might be right in the middle of a barbecue right now, but nevertheless, I want to talk just a little bit about grilling. Is that okay?

Michelle Graves:
I love barbecue.

Kyle Case:
Yeah, I do too. I like to grill.

Michelle Graves:
Let's talk about it. Don't tell me it's bad though.

Kyle Case:
Well, so I think you're going to like this. I think you're going to like this. I do like to grill, something I like to do. I don't always take the time to do it. Especially in the middle of the summer in St. George, Utah, it's pretty hot to be standing outside by a grill. But it's something that I enjoy. But that being said, recently I've been reading about how grilling can actually be carcinogenic and not good for you, right?

Michelle Graves:
I was worried you were going to go there.

Kyle Case:
So, because I like it-

Michelle Graves:
I hope people aren't grilling right now. I hope they're finished with that portion of their day.

Kyle Case:
Maybe, maybe. But because I do like to grill, I wanted to get to the bottom of it, and I found what I was looking for. You know, you can find what you're looking for, right?

Michelle Graves:
I hope it ends well.

Kyle Case:
I found what I was looking for in a magazine that's called the Science Focus Online Magazine. Listen, here's the thing. The science of eating, it's a complicated thing. We kind of know how to put things together, and they even look at the molecular level. They know how to put the food together and make delicious things.

Michelle Graves:
Yes.

Kyle Case:
But once it gets inside of our stomachs, our knowledge of what happens exactly gets just a little bit fuzzy at that point. Did you know, Michelle, for example, just let me give you an example. That we didn't even know that we had acid in our stomachs until 1825. Like, we just didn't even know that.

Michelle Graves:
I did not know that.

Kyle Case:
It was not something that we were aware of. Researchers are just now starting to figure out how important the bacteria that live in our guts, which we call the microbiome, might be. So there's a lot that we're still trying to figure out from a scientific and a medical standpoint. So understandably, the science is a little bit kind of back and forth and waffles, when it comes to answering questions like, is wine good for you? Or even more importantly, is chocolate good for you?

Michelle Graves:
That's just a definite yes. I don't care what people say.

Kyle Case:
We just don't know for sure. There are studies that say it's really good for you, there are studies that say, "Eh, maybe not so much." So today on the capital of all grilling days, I want to talk just a little bit about what the scientists have to say about grilling. Here we go.

Michelle Graves:
Okay. Yeah, that sounds very interesting.

Kyle Case:
On the most basic level, the smoky flavor and the char that you get from a well-grilled steak, unfortunately, Michelle, they say is not particularly good for you.

Michelle Graves:
Oh.

Kyle Case:
When the fat from the cooking meat drips down onto the hot coals, the smoke that forms contains stuff that they call polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAH. The charred exterior of the meat, or the inside, if you like things done really, really well. You don't like things done that well, do you?

Michelle Graves:
No, I like my meat pretty rare.

Kyle Case:
Pretty rare, okay.

Michelle Graves:
So, is that better?

Kyle Case:
It's actually better for you.

Michelle Graves:
Oh, good.

Kyle Case:
Because the charred on the outside, or like I said, on the inside if you really like it done well, is chock-full of something that they call Heterocyclic Amines, or HCA. Both of these, unfortunately, have been linked to studies, especially in particular one that was done by the National Cancer Institute in 1999, to higher rates of colorectal cancers, and both the chemicals have been added to the Department of Health's official list of carcinogens. They've both been on there for quite a while.

Kyle Case:
In 2009, another study found that people who preferred their steaks very well done were 60% more likely to get pancreatic cancer than those who liked them rare or a little bit bloody ... Which is the way that you like it, a little bit more rare, right?

Michelle Graves:
Correct.

Kyle Case:
Okay, so that's a good thing for you. Both compounds have been found to cause tumors in mice and might even cause tumors in humans. They don't know for sure, because mice process the chemicals differently than humans do. So there's some stuff out there, but they haven't really figured it out for sure.

Michelle Graves:
And you're getting pretty technical, so it's impressive.

Kyle Case:
Well, there is the technical stuff there, yeah.

Michelle Graves:
Very scientific.

Kyle Case:
So let's be honest, that's not great news. You know, we don't want to hear that grilling a steak is going to cause cancer for us, right?

Michelle Graves:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
I don't want to hear that, I know you don't want to hear that.

Michelle Graves:
I want you to turn the page now.

Kyle Case:
I'm going to turn the page.

Michelle Graves:
And just kind of say all things in moderation. [crosstalk 00:05:29]

Kyle Case:
Exactly, that's my point.

Michelle Graves:
Okay, good.

Kyle Case:
That's exactly where I'm going. So you guessed it. This is science, and of course in science, there's a bunch of caveats. First of all, the first thing to know and understand and to remember, especially on this day of grilling, is that no one has determined what quantity these chemicals become carcinogenic. So, as with most things, as you said, Michelle, eating in moderation, it isn't all that bad for you.

Michelle Graves:
Yeah. We're concerned these days about our consumption of red meat anyway, and so we're going to keep it to a minimum, but still enjoy a good barbecue, right?

Kyle Case:
Yes, yes. You know, on occasion, I think you're going to be okay. They say there's a couple of things that you can do if you're worried about these things. Number one is to cut off the charred parts, or just make sure that it doesn't get charred. You can put some tinfoil underneath the meat so that the dripping fat doesn't create that flare up and that smoke that has the bad stuff in it. They do recommend microwaving your meat 30 to 60 seconds before you throw it on the grill. To me, that doesn't sound right, like, "I'm going to grill my meat, but first I'm going to microwave it." I don't think I like that idea, but-

Michelle Graves:
Plus, I feel like we could have a whole episode about microwaves.

Kyle Case:
Well, exactly. Yeah.

Michelle Graves:
There's controversy there too.

Kyle Case:
There's a whole other area of science that we're not-

Michelle Graves:
For another day.

Kyle Case:
... we're not going to get into that today.

Michelle Graves:
But I understand the principle behind it.

Kyle Case:
Yeah. So as you said, Michelle, really the thing is, I think the message here that I'm taking away from this is moderation in all things, having a barbecue on occasion, just by itself is probably not going to kill you. At least that's what I'm going with.

Michelle Graves:
Okay, I like that.

Kyle Case:
That's what I'm gathering from this.

Michelle Graves:
I like that. Thanks for shedding light on that subject. That's food for thought, isn't it?

Kyle Case:
Food for thoughts on a great day for food, the 4th of July. So today's guest, Michelle, is Allen Christensen. He is the Health Promotion and Wellness Operations Manager at the LiVe Well Center here in St. George, Utah. He's a BYU grad, he has a Master's Degree from the University of Colorado, Denver, and has received his Doctorate of Health Education from A.T. Still University of Health Sciences.

Kyle Case:
Allen, thanks for joining us. We're glad to visit with you today.

Allen Christens:
Absolutely. A pleasure being here. Thank you for having me.

Kyle Case:
So I'm curious, do you have an opinion on grilling and barbecuing? You work in the industry. What are your thoughts?

Allen Christens:
You know, I do like a good barbecue. But I think you touched it. You know, everything in moderation is huge. So, being able to balance that, which I think a little bit of what we'll talk about today about, you know, longevity and wellness.

Kyle Case:
Well, so let's jump into it. The name of the show is the Active Life and we try to talk about what that means on a personal level, and also on a macro level, how we actually achieve that. How can we live an active life? Today we want to talk a little bit, as you alluded to, about longevity and just overall health and wellness. You're in the industry, as I said. What are some things that you see that we need to be thinking about when it comes to longevity?

Allen Christens:
Well, when you think of longevity and wellness, I think everyone's going to have their own interpretation of that. You know, looking to the science, Dan Buettner, who was a pretty well-known name, published the Blue Zone Project. Either of you familiar with that?

Michelle Graves:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
I'm not aware of that. Tell me a little bit about it, I don't know what The Blue Zone is.

Allen Christens:
So The Blue Zone Project was an effort where they studied, actually, across the world, efforts where there were populations with high-density individuals who are living past their hundreds. They identified five places in the world, one being in the United States at Loma Linda, California. They developed basically nine things that took away that we can maybe have started adapting to our lives to help promote longevity and wellness.

Kyle Case:
So you're saying that if you want to live to be 100 years old, your chances are better if you live in Loma Linda, California? Is that what you said?

Allen Christens:
Well, as from the study, yeah.

Kyle Case:
So there's going to be a mass migration to California. [crosstalk 00:09:28]

Allen Christens:
Yeah, absolutely. No, they've actually, they've recently taken it where they're trying to take these nine practices and tried to encompass them in making practices in communities across the world to really change the environment and the culture to promote longevity and wellness.

Kyle Case:
So I know that Japan is another place where they have a lot of centenarians and there are, you know, other places around the world. So you mentioned nine things. Let's talk about a couple of them at least and share some of the studies, some of the findings of this study.

Allen Christens:
Yeah, absolutely. So one of the things that I know they promote heavily is the idea of moving naturally, so being able to be active without even thinking about it. It's interesting that you brought up Japan. So, my mother's actually a native of Japan. So having been there a lot, it definitely, they have it promoted that a lot where, you know, walking, bicycling, the promotion of stairs ... Just these things that we take for granted. Trying to incentivize people in taking the elevators by maybe making the elevators a little bit slower. You know, people ... We're in a society now-

Kyle Case:
Is that they do in Japan?

Allen Christens:
Yeah, absolutely.

Kyle Case:
I didn't know that.

Michelle Graves:
I didn't know that either.

Kyle Case:
There's something to that.

Allen Christens:
[crosstalk 00:10:40] Well, you think about it, you have to wait. If you're going to wait in the elevator for a long time, you get to the point it's like, "I might as well just take the stairs," right? [Crosstalk 00:10:47]

Michelle Graves:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
I actually like that idea.

Allen Christens:
Yeah. So it's just these little things that we can be doing more to really promote more active lifestyles.

Michelle Graves:
I just-

Kyle Case:
So moving naturally. I like that concept as well. Sorry to cut you off, Michelle.

Michelle Graves:
Oh, I just met a really interesting octarian, and he said the key to longevity is being able to drop your keys on the floor and bend over and pick them up. And he said having the mobility to do that is what will cause you to live over 100. That was his idea.

Kyle Case:
Because it's just not about the dropped the keys, but it's about living in such a way that when you do drop the keys, you're capable of doing that, right?

Michelle Graves:
Exactly. You're limber.

Kyle Case:
It sounds like this study really emphasized that concept of being able to just live naturally ... Standing up from a couch, getting up from a kneeling position, picking up your keys, you know, whatever those natural things are that, again, some of us take for granted, that we take for granted until we can't take them for granted anymore, right?

Allen Christens:
That's [crosstalk 00:11:45].

Kyle Case:
But if we're living that kind of lifestyle, it feels like what you're saying is the study found that's just going to carry on into a longer and a better life.

Allen Christens:
Yeah, and I think it doesn't even have to be anything that's grand or adventurous. I mean, my wife's grandmother was living with us and every day she would go out for a walk and the neighborhood became aware of that. And so, she was just known as the grandma that walked every day. And so, it's just little things like that that I think can make a big difference in an individual's life.

Kyle Case:
Awesome. Awesome. I like that. I love that, that as a concept. What are some of the other things they found? I'm not going to hold you to all nine of them. [crosstalk 00:12:20] memorized, but-

Allen Christens:
No, yeah. Another one that comes to mind is the focus on the priority of loved ones first. So the idea that you know, having close, strong family connections, being culturally tied in finding efforts to really prioritize that. They found it to be a huge effort in longevity.

Kyle Case:
I just read a study just ... Actually, it was for last week's show that just really exemplified what you're talking about there, and they found that the ... In this in this study group, and it was a longevity study that they were looking at. So you know, they took 1500 people and they followed them for like a 30, 40-year time period. They found that the people with the most friends, the people that consider themselves with the most friends, lived longer than the people with the least amount of friends. So there's something really to that concept of social interaction and the ability to have relationships and keep relationships and create relationships.

Kyle Case:
I've seen other studies that say, you know, close relationships are great and very important, but even peripheral relationships can go a long way to your overall health and wellness. The study, I said, even just waving to your mailman and saying hi and smiling and having a relationship ... Even though, you know, maybe you're not inviting him over for dinner or whatever ... Those kinds of relationships also can play into a long happy, healthy life.

Allen Christens:
Absolutely. We have clients at the LiVe Well Center who actually come and all the classes are kind of focused on having this social network, small groups that work out together. And I would say there's a number of them that actually, their number one priority is actually that social connective piece rather than the exercise. The exercise is kind of a secondary-

Kyle Case:
Secondary-

Allen Christens:
... benefit.

Kyle Case:
And we see that at the Huntsman World Senior Games as well. You know, people are coming to compete. Competition is a reason that they come for sure. But man, they really connect with people and in many ways and in many times, they're coming to the games, they call it a family reunion, where they get to be together with everybody once again. And sometimes, they're only seeing them once a year, but it means a lot to those people to be able to have that connection and to interact.

Allen Christens:
Yeah, absolutely.

Kyle Case:
Awesome.

Allen Christens:
Another one that kind of comes to mind, I think, which is appropriate for the 4th of July is, they had this rule about an 80% rule. So, that when you're eating, that you are basically kind of leave 20% capacity available for nothing. So the idea, you know ...

Kyle Case:
I don't ...

Michelle Graves:
[crosstalk 00:14:48] today.

Kyle Case:
... today on my plate. I'm just going, to be honest, that's probably not happening today.

Michelle Graves:
It's not a good thing to talk about on the 4th. You have to have exceptions for that rule.

Allen Christens:
For sure.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Michelle Graves:
For the-

Allen Christens:
Moderation, right?

Michelle Graves:
Yeah. [crosstalk 00:14:59] But for 80% of the time you should follow the 80% rule.

Allen Christens:
That's right. That's right.

Kyle Case:
Yeah.

Allen Christens:
So, if you figure for the course of the year if you could do that 80% and then save that 20% cheat days for the holidays, right?

Kyle Case:
I like it. I like it.

Michelle Graves:
Yeah, definitely.

Kyle Case:
Of course, you have to consider to some degree the size of the plate as well, you know? And so, you could leave at 20%, but if your plate is like the size of a wheelbarrow, you're probably not getting the benefits there, either.

Allen Christens:
And that's what they actually talk about, a strategy of how you disguise to make your plate or your food look bigger than it actually is.

Kyle Case:
Use a smaller plate, right?

Allen Christens:
Yeah, absolutely.

Kyle Case:
You're listening to the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life, and we're visiting with Allen Christensen. He's the Regional Director of the LiVe Well Center here and Dixie Regional Medical Center. And we're talking about longevity and some of the things that we can all do, and it sounds like these are easy things. These aren't things that are overwhelming, they're hard to do, but just a few things that we can all do that can help us live a longer, happier, healthier life.

Kyle Case:
You mentioned that there were nine results that they found from this, The Blue Zone, is that what you call it?

Allen Christens:
Correct. The Blue Zone Project.

Kyle Case:
So we've talked about a couple of them. Let's hit one more. What's another one that stands out to you?

Allen Christens:
Another one, I think, is the idea of the focus around having a purpose. So, this was kind of originated from Okinawa. They actually called the term [Foreign Language 00:16:20] which is kind of knowing you're why when you wake up in the morning. So, having a sense of purpose, I think is, you know, I think all of us when we wake up and we have something that we know that we're excited, that we're going to be going to, whether it's work, at-home projects, whatever it is ... I think it definitely brings multiple benefits in terms of stress reduction, excitement. There's probably the endorphins that play in the mix.

Michelle Graves:
Productivity in general. I think when you start to lose your productivity, you naturally become more sedentary and so that becomes problematic.

Allen Christens:
Absolutely.

Kyle Case:
Know your purpose. I like that as well. And again, to me, another one that translates very easily over to the athletes at the Huntsman World Senior Games, so often we hear them talking about, "This is the reason I get up in the morning. I get up, you know, I have the aches and pains that everybody has, but I still get to the pool because I want to get ready for this event."

Kyle Case:
And whatever your purpose is, it doesn't have to be the Huntsman World Senior Games. It doesn't have to be an athletic event.

Michelle Graves:
It's great if it is.

Kyle Case:
That's a great one. That's a great one. You know, we'll put it up at the top of the list.

Allen Christens:
Absolutely.

Michelle Graves:
Right, right.

Kyle Case:
But there are other things that are, great causes and purposes and reasons. And maybe it's your family. Maybe it's a relationship with a friend. Maybe it's a volunteer opportunity. Maybe it's a project that you're working on, or maybe it's your job. Whatever it is, knowing your purpose and getting up and having that purpose that keeps you moving forward and, you know, driving that way. To me, it feels like that's got to be an advantage. That's got to keep you going.

Allen Christens:
Yeah, absolutely.

Kyle Case:
I like it. Awesome.

Kyle Case:
Well, we've talked about several things from a longevity standpoint that people can do. Being active also has to be a piece of that element as well. As you're working with clients that are in their golden years, you know, 50 and above and 60 and 70 and 80, what are you seeing that is most successful with them from an activity standpoint?

Allen Christens:
I just think, you know, making it a habit, making a daily ritual. You know, I think like the example of my wife's grandmother who ... It was every day. It was like clockwork. She knew that somewhere on that day she was going to go out and she was going to walk. And again, you know, 30 minutes might not seem a lot. But then when you multiply that by, you know, five, six, seven days, and then you go over the weeks and then you think about the year, how many minutes you dedicate to that. I mean, it makes a huge impact.

Kyle Case:
And I think that's the thing to remember, is that it's just one step at a time, right?

Allen Christens:
Yeah.

Kyle Case:
I think sometimes we get caught up in the concept of health and wellness and, "Oh, I can't do it because it's too hard or I don't have the time for it." And it just comes down to starting where you're at and then moving forward from there. Wouldn't you agree?

Allen Christens:
Absolutely. I mean, years ago I volunteered at the Huntsman Senior Games and, you know, knowing that these individuals are doing amazing things, but it was actually just starting ... They had to start somewhere, as you said, and just trying to develop to a point where they got. I have a father-in-law who runs triathlons and he's in his mid-sixties. We've done the triathlons together and he's definitely shown me some areas that I can improve on. But again, and I know it's because he's made that a daily effort to continually strive to improve upon, started somewhere and it's grown and it's gotten better each day as he's put that into practice.

Kyle Case:
One of the best pieces of advice that I ever received from an athlete at the Huntsman World Senior Games just echoes what you're saying there. And he said to me, "If you want to be active in your 70s then you've gotta be active in your 60s. And if you want to be active in your 60s then you better be active in your 50s. And if you want to be ready to go into your 50s, then you've got to be getting after it in your 40s." And I just thought, you know, that's so simple. It's such a simple concept. And of course it's so logical, but that resonated with me.

Kyle Case:
And I have certainly not been perfect in my activity over the last years. You know, I've had times when I've been more active. I have at times when I've taken time off and felt the sluggy effects of that. But I've really remembered that and I've thought, "That just makes a lot of sense," you know?

Kyle Case:
And as I've aged and as I've gotten closer to be eligible to compete at the Huntsman World Senior Games, I'm just a few years out now, and I feel like it starts resonating even more with me. You know, like if I want to be ready, I'm going to need to continue to try to stay active right now.

Allen Christens:
Yeah.

Michelle Graves:
And buy a bike.

Kyle Case:
And possibly buy a bike. [crosstalk 00:21:01] Possibly.

Michelle Graves:
And talk about that.

Kyle Case:
Michelle and I have had a number of conversations about, you know, what's my lifetime sport? Right now I'm still holding on to wrestling. I know I'm not going to be able to do that forever, but I'm still holding on to it. I do an event once a year and then I help out with the local wrestling team. I-

Michelle Graves:
There are lots of great ways to stay in shape, but triathlon might be your sport at the senior games

Kyle Case:
And it could be.

Michelle Graves:
I don't know.

Kyle Case:
And I've done a couple of triathlons, and I will say that I've enjoyed the challenge of it. I just have never bought a bike. I've always borrowed a bike and I've always had a funny/horrible story because of a borrowed bike.

Michelle Graves:
I just want him to have a better experience.

Allen Christens:
Yeah, absolutely.

Michelle Graves:
But that's a whole-nother show.

Allen Christens:
That sounds like a 4th of July challenge here.

Michelle Graves:
There you go.

Kyle Case:
Well, again, I'm up for the challenge of a triathlon. I'm just not sure I'm ready to invest, as much as I am told I need to, in a bike. Like to me, a $79 bike from Kmart is the only bike I've ever owned. So, to jump to a $700 or a $7,000 bike is a big jump for me [crosstalk 00:22:05].

Michelle Graves:
So we're going to do some test research and have him do a triathlon-

Kyle Case:
I'll ride my little $79 bike.

Michelle Graves:
... on that, and then a $7900 bike and then see what the difference is. But again, by small means, great things are accomplished.

Allen Christens:
That's right.

Michelle Graves:
That's our [crosstalk 00:22:22]-

Allen Christens:
That's what they say. Amen.

Kyle Case:
So, Allen, we've got about a minute left. [crosstalk 00:22:25] If you had one piece of advice that you would share with somebody who's out there, maybe they're on the fence, trying to decide, "Is this active life thing for me?" What would you say to them?

Allen Christens:
I think the biggest thing is yes. I mean, that's the way I look at it, as just an investment. You're putting something in and you're not going to see the results immediately. I mean, we have a client that comes to mind at the LiVe Well Center who's like in her 70s right now. And one thing that really stood out to me is she says, "Because of coming here and making that practice, I feel like I'm in better shape now at 70 than I was when I was 60, 55."

Allen Christens:
And I just think that's amazing.

Michelle Graves:
That is, that's great.

Kyle Case:
And I love that concept. And you know, you just see it. You look around and you see it. And again, I just want to emphasize that concept of start where you are, because I think there's a lot of people that are maybe in their 50s or 60s and maybe they're a little overweight and you know, maybe they're having some health problems and they just think, "Oh, it's too late for me. It's too late for me."

Kyle Case:
But it's not, it's absolutely not. We can make strides. We can, again. start where we are and move forward from there and see changes in our lives and our bodies and our mental and emotional approach to life. It's not too late. We have so many athletes at the games that started in their 50s or started in their sixties, and they're having a great time right now, and they're really enjoying and living life. So great advice. Perfect. Thank you so much.

Kyle Case:
Thanks for joining us today.

Allen Christens:
Hey, thank you. Appreciate it.

Kyle Case:
Michelle, as we've talked, it's July.

Michelle Graves:
It is.

Kyle Case:
We have hit July.

Michelle Graves:
It's heating up here a little bit.

Kyle Case:
Summer is in full swing for sure, so that means a couple of things. One is that it is getting warmer outside. In fact, some might say it's getting hot outside, which it is. But it's also time to register for the Huntsman World Senior Games. We already have over 7,000 registered participants and we're on track for a record year. If you're interested in being a part of the games ... and we hope that you're interested in being a part of the games ... register. Get on the website, get that on your calendar, use that motivation to help you really live the active life.

Kyle Case:
Registering is very easy to do. Just visit seniorgames.net, click on Register. The process is very simple. It's fast, it's secure, and you can be a part of more than the 11,000 athletes who will compete this year.

Kyle Case:
The dates for the 2019 Huntsman World Senior Games are October 7th through the 19th. And again, seniorgames.net, click on Register, and you can be a part of the fun.

Kyle Case:
Remember to tune in live, next and every Thursday at 5:30 PM Mountain Time on AM 1450 or FM 93.1 for the Huntsman World Senior Games Active Life. You can also subscribe to our podcast pretty much anywhere that podcasts are found. Once you've subscribed, give us a rating, write a quick review. You can really make a difference in helping us spread the word. You also can find this as well as previous episodes, right on our website, at seniorgames.net, so check it out.

Kyle Case:
Michelle, our inspirational thought comes from the motivational speaker, Brian Tracy, and he says, "There is no limit to what you can accomplish except the limits you place on your own thinking."

Kyle Case:
Until next Thursday, stay active.

Michelle Graves:
Bye-bye.